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Boston Marathon Bombings: Manhunt Ends In Capture [SLIDESHOW]

By: Associated Press; CT Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection Email
By: Associated Press; CT Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection Email
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Associated Press Release

UPDATE: April 21, 2013

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says surveillance video from the Boston Marathon attack shows the suspect putting his backpack down and moving away in time to avoid being injured by the blast of the bomb inside it.

Speaking Sunday, Patrick says the video clearly puts 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev at the scene of the attack. Tsarnaev is in serious condition at a Boston hospital after his capture Friday.

Patrick says the video is "pretty clear about his involvement and pretty chilling, frankly."

He says he hasn't viewed all the surveillance tapes but has been briefed by law enforcement about them.

Tsarnaev's older brother, Tamerlan, is also considered a suspect. He died in a gun battle with police earlier Friday.

Investigators have determined the bombs were fashioned from pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails and ball bearings.

Associated Press Release

A Glance at the Search for Boston Bomb Suspects

BOSTON (AP) -- Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the Massachusetts governor, the Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police and Boston police.

-- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

-- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

-- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

-- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

-- Police soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

-- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

-- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

-- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

-- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2 wearing a gray hoodie-style sweatshirt. The image apparently is from surveillance video taken at a gas station.

-- Around 5:50 a.m. authorities urge residents in Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, Arlington and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay indoors. All mass transit is shut down.

-- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least a year.

-- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge.

-- Around 8 a.m., Boston's police commissioner says all of Boston must stay in their homes as the search for the surviving suspect in the bombings continues.

-- Around 8:40 a.m., a U.S. law enforcement official and the uncle of the suspects confirm that the name of the slain suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's older brother.

-- Around 10:20 a.m., Connecticut State Police say a car believed to be linked to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been recovered in Boston. They initially call it a Honda CRV, but authorities later say it was a Honda Civic.

-- Around 10:35 a.m., the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth says it closed its campus and ordered an evacuation after confirming that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is registered there. The school says it closed the campus "out of an abundance of caution" as the search continued.

-- Around 11:30 a.m., Massachusetts State Police explain that the brothers suspected in the bombings were in the Honda when they carjacked the Mercedes SUV. For a while, each drove one of the two vehicles, but then ditched the Honda and reunited in the Mercedes.

-- Around 12:35 p.m., state police in Watertown say officers are searching door-to-door but still have not found the bombing suspect.

-- Around 6:30 p.m., Massachusetts Gov. Patrick Deval announces that mass transit is resuming and the "stay indoors" order is being lifted even though one suspect remains on the lam. State police say that suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, fled on foot and there is indication he has a vehicle. They believe he is still in the state because of his ties to the area.

--Around the time the order is lifted, a flurry of gunfire breaks out in the same community that was being searched. Law enforcement officials locate Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a boat parked behind a home.

--Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is taken into custody by police at approximately 8:45 p.m. Spontaneous applause breaks out among police and onlookers surrounding the scene and residents take to the streets to cheer police.


Associated Press Release

Justice official: No reading of Miranda rights

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A Justice Department official says the Boston Marathon bombing suspect will not be read his Miranda rights because the government is invoking a public safety exception.

That official and a second person briefed on the investigation says 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be questioned by a special interrogation team for high-value suspects. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to disclose the information publicly.

The public safety exception permits law enforcement officials to engage in a limited and focused unwarned interrogation of a suspect and allows the government to introduce the statement as evidence in court. The public safety exception is triggered when police officers have an objectively reasonable need to protect the police or the public from immediate danger.


CBS News Copy

WATERTOWN, Mass. The second and last remaining suspect in the deadly Boston Marathon bombing was taken into custody alive in a Boston suburb Friday evening after an intense standoff, Boston police and city officials said.

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said police had discovered that Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, of Cambridge, Mass., had taken refuge in a boat behind a home shortly after they lifted the lockdown designed to assist an intense manhunt, and that the suspected Boston Marathon bomber was arrested.

After the standoff, the Boston Police Department tweeted: "CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over. The search is done. The terror is over. And justice has won. Suspect in custody."

The man was taken away from the scene in an ambulance. Authorities have not confirmed any injuries.

Police initially responded en masse Friday evening after shots were heard in the town where Tsarnaev was last seen. Authorities approached the situation cautiously because they believed Tsarnaev had explosives.

Police say Tsarnaev escaped on foot early Friday after escaping a gun battle in which explosives were lobbed at police and in which his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, also a suspect in the Marathon bombing, was killed.

Tsarnaev had evaded a furious police manhunt that effectively shut down the city of Boston Friday.

Prior to the gun battle in Watertown, Mass., in which a police officer was critically wounded, the two suspects killed an MIT police officer, then hijacked a car.

Federal sources believe the suspect who is still alive is either wearing an explosive vest, or has explosives with him, reports national security correspondent Bob Orr.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis says the suspect at large is the one seen in the white hat in images of the Boston Marathon suspects released by the FBI Thursday. Davis says he is "armed and dangerous."

At a press briefing late Friday afternoon Col. Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police said investigators have completed a sweep of the 20-block interior of Watertown.

"We do not have an apprehension o our suspect this afternoon, but we will have one. We're committed to that," said Alben.

Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick, who has earlier imposed a "stay-indoors" order for the city, said this afternoon that the order has been lifted, but he asked the public to remain vigilant.

Police evacuated residents in Cambridge who lived on the same block as one of the suspects, in whose house several homemade bombs were discovered by police.

"These are pipe bombs with internal threads and caps on either end, with standard fuses - [not] very sophisticated stuff, but dangerous stuff," CBS News senior correspondent John Miller said.

Beginning early Friday residents throughout the Boston area -- including Watertown, Cambridge, Waltham, Newton and Belmont -- were advised to keep their doors locked and not let anyone in. The Boston Police Department warned residents to "stay home." Vehicles were barred from entering or leaving Watertown.

Universities throughout Boston were closed; public transit, bus line and taxi service was suspended, as was Amtrak service was also suspended indefinitely between Boston and New York. The FAA has also imposed temporary flight restrictions in the Boston area. Logan International Airport is open but is operating under heightened security. JetBlue is allowing anybody scheduled to fly to or from Boston to change their ticket for free.


Associated Press Release

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama will speak from the White House Friday night following the capture of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing investigation.

Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been holed up in a boat in a Watertown, Mass., neighborhood. His older brother was killed earlier Friday in a furious attempt to escape police.

Obama was briefed on the situation throughout the day by Attorney General Eric Holder, FBI Director Robert Mueller and other national security officials.


Boston Police Dept. Boston Police Dept.Verified account ‏@Boston_Police

Suspect in custody. Officers sweeping the area. Stand by for further info.


Associated Press Release

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- A law enforcement official says the suspect being hunted in the Boston Marathon bombing is in a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., neighborhood.

The official said he was briefed on the situation and spoke on condition of anonymity because he's not authorized to discuss it publicly.

The official does not know if Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (JOH'-kahr tsahr-NY'-ev) is dead or alive.

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

The burst of activity came at the end of a tense day in and around Boston, and less than an hour after police announced that they were scaling back the hunt because they had come up empty-handed following an all-day search that sent thousands of SWAT team officers into the streets and paralyzed the metropolitan area.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Gunfire erupted Friday night amid the manhunt for the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, and police in armored vehicles and tactical gear rushed into the Watertown neighborhood in a possible break in the case.

The burst of activity came at the end of a tense day in and around Boston, and less than an hour after police announced that they were scaling back the hunt because they had come up empty-handed following an all-day search that sent thousands of SWAT team officers into the streets and paralyzed the metropolitan area.

Less than an hour after the hail of gunfire, a round of blasts could be heard. A state police spokesman said only that the activity was related to the search for 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Boston Mayor Tom Menino told WBZ-TV the suspect was holed up in a boat parked in a backyard. Reporters were being kept away from the scene and a message left for Menino's spokeswoman wasn't immediately returned.

Before the gunfire, State Police Col. Timothy Alben said at a news conference that he believed Tsarnaev was still in Massachusetts because of his ties to the area. But authorities lifted the stay-indoors warning for people in the Boston area, and the transit system started running again by evening.

"We can't continue to lockdown an entire city or an entire state," Alben said. At the same time, he and other authorities warned that Tsarnaev is a killer and that people should be vigilant.

Tsarnaev fled on foot after a furious overnight gun battle that left 200 spent rounds behind and after a wild car chase in which he and his brother hurled explosives at police, authorities said. His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died in the shootout, run over by his younger brother in a car as he lay wounded, according to investigators.

During the overnight spasm of violence, the brothers also shot and killed an MIT policeman and severely wounded another officer, authorities said.

Law enforcement officials and family members identified the brothers as ethnic Chechens who came to the U.S. from Russia. They lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade, an uncle said.

Around midday, as the manhunt dragged on, the suspects' uncle Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., pleaded on television: "Dzhokhar, if you are alive, turn yourself in and ask for forgiveness."

The search by thousands of law enforcement officers all but paralyzed the Boston area for much of the day. Officials shut down all mass transit, including Amtrak trains to New York, advised businesses not to open, and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay inside and unlock their doors only for uniformed police.

"We believe this man to be a terrorist," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said. "We believe this to be a man who's come here to kill people."

Some neighborhoods resembled a military encampment, with officers patrolling with guns drawn and aimed, residents peering nervously from windows and people near surrounded buildings spirited away.

The bloody turn in the case came just hours after the FBI released photos and video of two suspects in the bombing and asked for the public's help in identifying and catching them.

Authorities said the man dubbed Suspect No. 1 -- the one in sunglasses and a dark baseball cap in the surveillance-camera pictures -- was Tamerlan Tsarnaev, while Suspect No. 2, the one in a white baseball cap worn backward, was his brother.

The bombings on Monday near the Boston Marathon finish line killed three people and wounded more than 180, tearing off limbs in a spray of shrapnel and sparking fears across the nation that another terrorist attack had come to U.S. soil.

Chechnya has been the scene of two wars between Russian forces and separatists since 1994, in which tens of thousands were killed in heavy Russian bombing. That spawned an Islamic insurgency that has carried out deadly bombings in Russia and the region, although not in the West.

But investigators have shed no light on the motive for the Boston Marathon bombing and said it was unclear whether any terrorist organizations had a hand in it.

The FBI was swamped with tips after the release of the photos -- 300,000 every minute by one estimate -- but what role those played in the overnight clash was unclear. State Police spokesman Dave Procopio said police realized they were dealing with the bombing suspects based on what the two men told a carjacking victim during their getaway attempt.

Exactly how the long night of crime began was marked by conflicting reports. But police said the brothers carjacked a man in a Mercedes-Benz in Cambridge, just across the Charles River from Boston, then released him unharmed at a gas station.

They also shot to death a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer, 26-year-old Sean Collier, while he was responding to a report of a disturbance, investigators said.

The search for the Mercedes led to a chase that ended in Watertown, where authorities said the suspects threw explosive devices from the car and exchanged gunfire with police. A transit police officer, 33-year-old Richard Donohue, was shot and critically wounded, authorities said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev somehow slipped away. He ran over his already wounded brother as he fled by car, according to two law enforcement officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the investigation.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died at a Boston hospital after suffering what doctors said were multiple gunshot wounds and a possible blast injury.

The brothers had built an arsenal of pipe bombs, grenades and improvised explosive devices and used some of the weapons in trying to make their getaway, said Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., a member of the House Intelligence Committee.

Another uncle, Alvi Tsarnaev, who also lives in Montgomery Village, Md., told news organizations that Tamerlan Tsarnaev had called him Thursday night -- hours before his firefight with police -- and the two spoke for the first time in two or three years. He said the young man asked for forgiveness for the rift in the family.

"He said, `I love you and forgive me,"' the uncle said.

Watertown resident Kayla Dipaolo said she was woken up overnight by gunfire and a large explosion that sounded "like it was right next to my head ... and shook the whole house." She said she was looking at the front door when a bullet came through the side paneling. SWAT team officers were running all over her yard, she said.

"It was very scary," she said. "There are two bullet holes in the side of my house, and by the front door there is another."

Christine Yajko said she heard two loud explosions and gunfire. She said a police officer later knocked on her door and told her there was an undetonated improvised explosive device in the street and warned her to stay away from the windows.

"It was on the street, right near our kitchen window," she said.

Tsarni, the men's uncle, said the brothers traveled here together from Russia. He called his nephews "losers" and said they had struggled to settle in the U.S. and ended up "thereby just hating everyone."

U.S. government officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not allowed to talk about an investigation in progress, said Tamerlan Tsarnaev traveled to Russia last year and returned to the U.S. six months later.

His last known address was in Cambridge, Mass. He had studied accounting as a part-time student at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston for three semesters from 2006 to 2008, the school said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was registered as a student at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Students said he lived in a dorm there and was on campus this week after the Boston Marathon bombing. The campus closed down Friday along with colleges around the Boston area.

The city of Cambridge announced two years ago that it had awarded a $2,500 scholarship to him. At the time, he was a senior at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, a highly regarded public school whose alumni include Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and NBA Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing.

The men's father, Anzor Tsarnaev, said in a telephone interview with AP from the Russian city of Makhachkala that his younger son, Dzhokhar, is "a true angel." He said his son was studying medicine.

"He is such an intelligent boy," the father said. "We expected him to come on holidays here."

According to the FBI, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was seen setting down a bag at the site of the second of two explosions at the marathon finish line.

Insurgents from Chechnya and neighboring restive provinces in the Caucasus have long been involved in terrorist attacks in Moscow and other places in Russia.

In 2002, Chechen militants took 800 people hostage in Moscow and held them for two days before special forces stormed the building, killing all 41 captors. Also killed were 129 hostages, mostly from the effects of the gas Russian forces used to subdue the attackers.

Chechen insurgents also launched a 2004 raid in the southern Russian town of Beslan and took hundreds of hostages. The siege ended in a bloodbath two days later, with more than 330 people, about half of them children, killed.

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Sullivan and Associated Press writer Stephen Braun reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Jay Lindsay in Watertown, Pat Eaton-Robb in Boston and Jeff Donn in Cambridge, Mass., contributed to this report.


Press Release: FBI BOSTON

No longer seeking 1999 Honda Civic. Tips to: bostonmarathontips.fbi.gov.


Press Release: Connecticut Department of Emergency Services &
Public Protection

Since the tragic bombing that took place in Boston on April 15, the Connecticut State Police has monitored all intelligence related to this investigation.

Today, April 19, 2013, the Connecticut State Police received information from the Boston Investigation that a suspect vehicle could POSSIBLY be occupied by a wanted suspect.

The vehicle is described by BOSTON AREA AUTHORITIES; the SUSPECT MAY BE OPERATING A:

1999 Green Honda Civic

REGISTRATION: 116 GC7 Massachusetts

Connecticut Troopers are posted strategically in our State and continue to communicate with Massachusetts authorities.

THIS CASE REMAINS UNDER INVESTIGATION.


Associated Press Release

By EILEEN SULLIVAN, MEGHAN BARR and KATIE ZEZIMA

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- State police say officers are going door-to-door, but the Boston Marathon suspect is still on the loose.

Col. Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police said Friday afternoon that officers would go street to street as the manhunt for the bombing suspect continues. Gov. Deval Patrick urged residents to continue staying indoors.

A pair of brothers is suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint.

The suspects' clashes with police began hours after the FBI released photos and videos of them. Monday's bombings killed three people and wounded more than 180 others.

Twenty-six-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev (tsahr-NY'-ev) was killed overnight. His 19-year-old brother, Dzhokhar (JOH'-kahr) is on the loose.


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police and Boston police.

-- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

-- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

-- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

-- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

-- Police soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

-- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

-- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

-- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

-- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police hold a short outdoor news briefing. They tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2, apparently taken from store video earlier in the evening at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Cambridge. He is wearing a gray hoodie-style sweatshirt.

-- Around 5:50 a.m. authorities urge residents in Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, Arlington and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay indoors. All mass transit is shut down.

-- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least a year.

-- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge.

-- Around 8 a.m. Boston's police commissioner says all of Boston must stay in their homes as the search for the surviving suspect in the bombings continues.

-- Around 8:40 a.m., a U.S. law enforcement official and the uncle of the suspects confirm that the name of the slain suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's older brother.


Associated Press Release

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama is being briefed on the developments in Boston Marathon bombing investigation by Attorney General Eric Holder, FBI Director Robert Mueller and several other national security officials.

Vice President Joe Biden is also attending the briefing in the White House Situation Room. Secretary of State John Kerry, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and CIA director John Brennan are among the other top officials in the briefing.

The bombing suspects were identified by law enforcement officials as brothers from a Russian region near Chechnya. One suspect is dead and a second remains at large.

Thousands of officers have swarmed the streets in a manhunt that all but paralyzed the Boston area.


CBS Tweet

Police: Boston bombing suspect may be in gray Honda CRV, Mass. plates: 316ES9


Associated Press Release

By EILEEN SULLIVAN, MEGHAN BARR and KATIE ZEZIMA

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Boston's police commissioner says all of Boston must stay in their homes as the search for the surviving suspect in the marathon bombings continues.

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis made the announcement Friday morning, after a long night of violence that left the other suspect dead.

The suspects were identified to The Associated Press as coming from the Russian region near Chechnya, which has been plagued by an Islamic insurgency stemming from separatist wars.

A law enforcement intelligence bulletin obtained by the AP identified the surviving suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev (JOE-khar Tsahr-NEYE-ev), 19, of Cambridge, Mass.

The two men are suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer on campus in Cambridge late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint and later releasing its driver unharmed.

The suspects' clashes with police began only a few hours after the FBI released photos and videos of the two young men, who were seen carrying backpacks as they mingled among revelers at Monday's Boston Marathon. The bombings on Monday killed three people and wounded more than 180 others, and authorities revealed the images to enlist the public's help finding the suspects.


Associated Press Release

By MEGHAN BARR and KATIE ZEZIMA

WATERTOWN, Massachusetts (AP) -- One of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing is dead after the killing of a university officer and a shootout with police, and a massive manhunt is underway for the other, authorities said early Friday.

Police locked down some neighborhoods in Boston and its western suburbs as they searched for the remaining suspect, known as the man in the white hat from marathon surveillance footage.

"We believe this to be a terrorist," said Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis. "We believe this to be a man who's come here to kill people. We need to get him in custody."

Authorities urged residents to stay indoors in Cambridge, Watertown and other western towns with a population of about 250,000, as well as neighborhoods in western Boston. All mass transit was shut down, and businesses were asked not to open Friday. People waiting at bus and subway stops were told to go home.

All modes of public transportation were shut down, including buses, subways, trolleys, commuter rail and boats, said Joe Pesaturo, spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority.

The Middlesex district attorney said the two men are suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer on campus in Cambridge late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint and later releasing its driver unharmed.

Hours earlier, police had released photos of the marathon bombing suspects and asked for the public's help finding them. A new photo of the suspect on the loose was released later showing him in a grey hoodie sweatshirt. It was taken at a 7-Eleven store in Cambridge, just across the Charles River from Boston.

The first images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the bombing victims.

Authorities say the suspects threw explosives from the car as police followed it into Watertown. The suspects and police exchanged gunfire, and one of the suspects was critically injured and later died at a hospital while the other escaped.

The FBI said it was working with local authorities to determine what happened.

Watertown resident Christine Yajko said she was awakened at about 1:30 a.m. (0530 GMT) by a loud noise, began to walk to her kitchen and heard gunfire.

"I heard the explosion, so I stepped back from that area, then I went back out and heard a second one," she said. "It was very loud. It shook the house a little."

She said a police officer later knocked on her door and told her there was an undetonated improvised explosive device in the street and warned her to stay away from the windows.

"It was on the street, right near our kitchen window," she said.

Yajko said she never saw the suspect who was on the loose and didn't realize the violence was related to the marathon bombings until she turned on the TV and began watching what was happening outside her side door.

Doctors at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, where a suspect in the marathon bombings was taken and later died, said they treated a man with a possible blast injury and multiple gunshot wounds. They wouldn't say if the patient they treated, who came in with police, was the suspect in the black hat from marathon surveillance footage.

The MIT shooting on the Cambridge campus Thursday night was followed by reports of gunfire and explosions in Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston.

The MIT officer had been responding to report of a disturbance Thursday night when he was shot multiple times, according to a statement from the Middlesex district attorney's office and Cambridge police. It said there were no other victims.

In Watertown, witnesses reported hearing multiple gunshots and explosions at about 1 a.m. (0500) Friday. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents were in the neighborhood and a helicopter circled overhead.

State police spokesman David Procopio said, "The incident in Watertown did involve what we believe to be explosive devices possibly, potentially, being used against the police officers."

Boston cab driver Imran Saif said he was standing on a street corner at a police barricade across from a diner when he heard an explosion.

"I heard a loud boom and then a rapid succession of pop, pop, pop," he said. "It sounded like automatic weapons. And then I heard the second explosion."

He said he could smell something burning and advanced to check it out but area residents at their windows yelled at him, "Hey, it's gunfire! Don't go that way!"

MIT said right after the 10:30 p.m. (0230 GMT) shooting that police were sweeping the campus in Cambridge and urged people to remain indoors. They urged people urged to stay away from the Stata Center, a mixed-use building with faculty offices, classrooms and a common area.

Hours later, MIT, the prestigious university with about 11,000 students, said the campus was clear but the shooter was still on the loose.

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Associated Press writer Pat Eaton-Robb contributed to this report from Boston.


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- The FBI has released photos of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and is asking for the public's help in identifying them.

FBI Agent Richard DesLauriers says one the suspects is believed to have planted the devices near the finish line of the race. He says both suspects are considered armed and extremely dangerous.

Within moments of the FBI releasing the images on its website, the agency's website crashed.

The explosions Monday killed three people and injured more than 180.

The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the victims, including an 8-year-old boy.

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