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Amid Evidence Cache in Martin Case, Questions Nag - SLIDE SHOW

By: CNN, CBS News; Mike Vasilinda Email
By: CNN, CBS News; Mike Vasilinda Email

Amid Evidence Cache in Martin Case, Questions Nag
by Allen G. Breed, Kyle Hightower, and Tamara Lush

Orlando, FL (AP) - May 18, 2012 --

Prosecutors in the Trayvon Martin case dumped a mountain of evidence on the public this week. In many criminal cases, that would bring clarity, start answering the basic questions.

But no one - not pundits, attorneys or the public - can safely say we're even close to knowing exactly how and why neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot and killed the 17-year-old in the black hoodie.

So many aspects of the Feb. 26 altercation and shooting in Sanford remain muddy. Who threw the first punch? Why did Zimmerman leave his car?

This cache of recordings, photos and statements is far from all the evidence. But it suggests there are answers we may never truly get.

"I can't comment on, you know, what George saw or what George was thinking," the suspect's father, Robert, told investigators in a March 19 interview included in Thursday's release. "Or what anybody saw or what they were thinking."

In some states, "discovery" like this isn't released prior to trial - unless it's by a defense team hoping to score points in the court of public opinion. That is what happened during the infamous 2006 Duke University lacrosse rape case, in which North Carolina officials ultimately determined that the local prosecutor rushed to judgment in charging three students with raping a stripper.

In Florida, evidence is generally considered a public record once the prosecution turns it over to the defense. Among the things prosecutors are prohibited from releasing pretrial: Confessions.

Zimmerman gave several interviews to police, including re-enacting at the scene what he says happened that night. But there is no statement from the 28-year-old shooter among the materials made public this week.

His only public comment so far came during his detention hearing last month, when he apologized to Martin's parents - but stopped short of admitting any crime.

Tamara Lave, a University of Miami law professor, says all this release does is to remind us how malleable "facts" can be.

"I think we always want evidence to be like we're Moses climbing the temple mountain: You read it and get all the questions answered," says Lave, who worked a decade as a public defender before entering academia. "I think people are really getting to find out how gray evidence really is."

Perhaps the biggest revelation was the release of photographs showing Zimmerman with two black eyes, a swollen nose and multiple lacerations on the back of his close-cropped head.

Zimmerman's lawyers have maintained their client was simply doing his duty when he noticed a stranger in the neighborhood and began following him. They say Martin was the aggressor, knocking Zimmerman to the ground, then pummeling him with his fists.

When Zimmerman pulled his 9 mm pistol and fired directly into the boy's chest, the defense says, he was within his rights under Florida's "stand your ground law." Under that law, people are given wide latitude to use deadly force rather than retreat in a fight if they believe they are in danger of being killed or seriously injured, if they weren't committing a crime themselves and if they are in a place they have the legal right to be.

Randy McClean, an Orlando-area defense attorney, has sifted through most of the evidence released thus far. He says it corroborates Zimmerman's story of a struggle that was "at least moderate in nature."

"But we still have the issue out there: Who was the initial aggressor?" McClean said. "The fact that there was a physical altercation, and it appears Martin was getting the better of Zimmerman in the altercation, it does not necessarily excuse Zimmerman's act. Because if he was the initial aggressor, he can't avail himself to the stand your ground law."

To Martin's family, none of that matters. Zimmerman shouldn't have been following their son in the first place, especially after a dispatcher told him to stand down.

But, as Lave notes, "You don't lose the right to self-defense because you act idiotic."

Some of the interviews released illustrate just how difficult it may be to reach the truth.

On one of the 911 calls, someone can be heard screaming for help just before the gunshot. When Martin's mother heard that audio, she declared definitively that it was his voice; the boy's father told an investigator it wasn't Trayvon.

Robert Zimmerman was adamant that the voice on the recording was HIS son's.

The FBI says it performed voice recognition analysis on the recording. Because of the poor audio quality, it was deemed inconclusive.

According to documents released this week, Martin's blood showed traces of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. We knew from earlier reports that he'd been disciplined for smoking pot, and the amounts found in his blood sample suggest he hadn't indulged in the days leading up to the incident, experts told The Associated Press.

Despite all this new evidence, some aren't sure the case will ever go to trial.

Before that can happen, a judge must first schedule a hearing on whether the stand your ground law applies. Zimmerman's attorneys will have to prove his case by a "preponderance of the evidence" - a fairly low bar, jurisprudence-wise. It just means that more likely than not, Zimmerman acted within the law.

"If he prevails, the prosecutor is barred from proceeding criminally," says Lave, "and the Martin family from pursuing him civilly."

She thinks this case will go to trial. Then, she believes, like many, that the testimony of Martin's girlfriend will be pivotal.

The girl, whose name was redacted from the released audio files, spoke with assistant state attorney Bernie De la Rionda on April 2. During the 22-minute interview, she said in a shaking voice that she had been talking with Martin since before he entered a 7-Eleven store to purchase his now famous iced tea and Skittles.

The cell connection was bad, and the couple were repeatedly disconnected. But at one point, Martin told her he noticed a white man sitting in a car, watching him.

"He was telling me, like, that man watching him, he going to start walking and then the phone hung up and I called him back again," the girl said. "And I said, `What you doing? And he said he walking and he said this man still following him."

It was drizzling, and the girl said Martin told her he was putting up his hood.

"I told him go to his dad's house," she said.

Martin told her that he was going to run. She could hear the wind blowing in the phone's speaker.

"He was breathing hard," she said. "(his) voice kinda changed. I know he was scared. (his) voice was getting kinda low."

Suddenly, she heard Martin say, "Why you following me for?"

The girl said she could hear another voice, one she described as deep and belonging to an "old man."

"The old man say, `What you doing around here?'"

She asked Martin repeatedly what was going on, but he didn't respond. She said she heard someone say, "Get off," though she thought it was her boyfriend.

She heard rustling, then nothing. No screaming, no gunshot.

The evidence dump included another interview with the girl, but the audio quality is so poor as to make it almost unintelligible. One thing that did come through: A detective mentioned that the girlfriend called Martin at 7:12 p.m.

When police arrived at the scene at 7:17 p.m., Martin was already shot and on the ground.

"She's the only person, for sure, that is a witness who knows what he (Martin) felt and sounded like in those moments," Lave says of the girlfriend. "All those things can play a role in the outcome of the case."

But there are gaps in the file no one can fill.

Martin can't describe his feelings that evening - whether he was angry, afraid, both.

Zimmerman - who has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder and is in hiding - could testify to his own state of mind. But would people believe anything he says?

Martin's parents say Zimmerman racially profiled the boy. Some of those who've spoken to police believe it.

"I don't know what happened," one distraught woman, who is not identified, says in one the recordings released this week. "I don't at all know who this kid was or anything else, but I know George. And I know that he does not like black people. He would start something just to start something. He's very confrontational. It's in his blood, we'll just say that."

Zimmerman's supporters say there's not a racist bone in his body.

"I know that George Zimmerman, if several Asians had broken in places there, and he saw an Asian walking around, he'd probably say, `Wait a minute. I recognize most of the people that live here, and I don't recognize that person,'" his father told police in the March 19 interview.

If he consents, police could subject the watchman to a polygraph test. But, even if it was admitted as evidence, you can't depose someone's heart.

For his part, Robert Zimmerman said he felt as if the case and the public storm surrounding it were "an avalanche, and I'm standing at the bottom of it ..."

With luck, the truth in this challenging case won't be buried there, too.

---

Associated Press writer Kelli Kennedy in Miami contributed to this report.

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Documents Shed New Light on Trayvon Martin Killing
by Mike Schneider and Kyle Hightower

Orlando, FL (AP) - May 17, 2012 --

Trayvon Martin was shot through the heart at close range. George Zimmerman had a broken nose, bruises and bloody cuts on the back of his head.

The lead investigator in the case wanted to charge Zimmerman with manslaughter in the weeks after the shooting but was overruled.

These are among the details revealed in nearly 200 pages of documents, photos and audio recordings that were released Thursday in a case that has riveted the nation. Yet it's still unclear what exactly happened and whether it was racially motivated.

The evidence supports Zimmerman's contention that he was being beat up when he fired the fatal shot. At the same time, it bolsters the argument of Martin's parents that Zimmerman was profiling Martin and that the whole confrontation could have been avoided if not for Zimmerman's actions.

Many of the pertinent questions remain unclear: What was in Zimmerman's mind when he began to follow Martin in the gated community where he lived? How did the confrontation between the two begin? Whose screams for help were captured on 911 calls? And why did Zimmerman feel that deadly force was warranted?

Another opportunity for answers isn't likely to come until a hearing later this year in which Zimmerman is expected to claim the shooting was justified under Florida's "stand your ground" law. Zimmerman's attorney, Mark O'Mara, didn't return a phone call seeking comment Thursday.

The evidence supporting Zimmerman's defense includes a photo showing the neighborhood watch volunteer with a bloody nose on the night of the fight. A paramedic report says Zimmerman had a 1-inch laceration on his head and forehead abrasion.

"Bleeding tenderness to his nose, and a small laceration to the back of his head. All injuries have minor bleeding," paramedic Michael Brandy wrote about Zimmerman's injuries in the report.

Whether Zimmerman was injured in the Feb. 26 altercation with Martin has been a key question. The 28-year-old has claimed self-defense and said he only fired because the unarmed teenager attacked him.

Zimmerman was not arrested for weeks because he invoked Florida's "stand your ground" law, which does not require a person to retreat in the face of a serious threat. He was released on bail and is in hiding while he awaits trial on a second-degree murder charge. He has pleaded not guilty.

Other evidence supports the contention of Martin's parents that Zimmerman was the aggressor.

The investigator who called for Zimmerman's arrest, Christopher Serino, told prosecutors that the fight could have been avoided if Zimmerman had remained in his vehicle and awaited the arrival of law enforcement. He said Zimmerman, after leaving his vehicle, could have identified himself to Martin as a concerned citizen and talked to him instead of confronting him. The report was written on March 13, nearly a month before Zimmerman's eventual arrest.

He said there is no evidence Martin was involved in any criminal activity as he walked from a convenience store to the home of his father's fiancee in the same gated community where Zimmerman lived.

The lawyer for Martin's parents seized on the investigator's recommendation.

"The police concluded that none of this would have happened if George Zimmerman hadn't gotten out of his car," said attorney Ben Crump. "If George Zimmerman hadn't gotten out of his car, they say it was completely avoidable. That is the headline."

The release of evidence did little to clear up whose voice is screaming for help in the background of several 911 calls made during the fight.

Since first hearing the calls in early March, Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, has been unequivocal in saying that it was her son's voice on the tapes.

But Serino wrote in a report that he played a 911 call for Martin's father, Tracy, in which the screams are heard multiple times.

"I asked Mr. Martin if the voice calling for help was that of his son," the officer wrote. "Mr. Martin, clearly emotionally impacted by the recording, quietly responded `no.'"

Zimmerman's father also told investigators that it was his son yelling for help on March 19.

"That is absolutely positively George Zimmerman," Robert Zimmerman said. "He was not just yelling, he sounded like he was screaming for his life."

Investigators sent all the recordings to the FBI for analysis. They were asked to determine who was screaming, and also if Zimmerman might have used an expletive in describing Martin. Prosecutors said in their charging documents that Zimmerman said "(expletive) punks" in describing Martin as he walked in the neighborhood.

But the analyst who examined the recordings determined the sound quality is too poor to decipher what Zimmerman uttered. In regards to the screams during the altercation, there also wasn't enough clarity to determine who it is "due to extreme stress and unsuitable audio quality."

The trajectory of the bullet - straight through Martin's body - doesn't shed light on whether Zimmerman and Martin were standing or on the ground, said Larry Kobilinsky, a professor of forensic science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York.

Kobilinsky added he thought the evidence diminished prosecutors' case for second-degree murder.

The case has become a national racial flashpoint because the Martin family and supporters contend Zimmerman singled Martin out because he was black. Zimmerman has a Peruvian mother and a white father.

Two acquaintances painted an unflattering picture of Zimmerman in police interviews.

A distraught woman told an investigator that she stays away from Zimmerman because he's racist and because of things he's done to her in the past, but she didn't elaborate on what happened between them.

"I don't at all know who this kid was or anything else. But I know George, and I know that he does not like black people. He would start something. He's very confrontational. It's in his blood. We'll just say that," the unidentified woman says in an audio recording.

A man whose name was deleted from the audio told investigators said he worked with Zimmerman in 2008 for a few months. It wasn't clear which company it was.

The man, who described his heritage as "Middle Eastern," said that when he first started, many employees didn't like him. Zimmerman seized on this, the employee said, and bullied him.

Zimmerman wanted to "get in" with the clique at work so he exaggerated a Middle Eastern accent when talking about the employee, the man said. The employee told investigators that Zimmerman made reference to terrorists and bombings when talking about him.

"It was so immature," said the employee, who ended up writing a letter to management about Zimmerman.

Zimmerman's parents say he wasn't racist. They say he had mentored black students and had a black relative.

The autopsy says medical examiners found THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, when they tested Martin's blood and urine. The amount described in the autopsy report is such a low level that it would have played no role in Martin's behavior, Kobilinksy said.

"This kind of level can be seen days after somebody smokes," Kobilinsky said. "If it comes up in the case, I would be surprised. It wouldn't benefit the defense, it wouldn't benefit the prosecution, and if the defense tried to bring it up, the judge would keep it out."

A police report shows the 17-year-old had been shot once in the chest and had been pronounced dead at the scene. The autopsy says the fatal shot was fired from no more than 18 inches away.

In a police interview, Zimmerman's father, Robert, described the toll the case had taken on family members who also are in hiding because of safety concerns.

"It just seems like it's an avalanche and I'm standing at the bottom of it," Robert Zimmerman said.

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Orlando, FL (AP) --

Prosecutors have released evidence in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin and one photograph shows George Zimmerman with a bloody marks on his head.

Click n the photo icon above to see the pictures of George Ziimmerman.

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Autopsy: Evidence of Marijuana in Martin's Blood

Orlando, FL (AP) - Medical examiners found evidence of marijuana in Trayvon Martin's system after he was fatally shot by a neighborhood watch volunteer, according to an autopsy released Thursday in a massive package of evidence.

Also included in the release was an investigator's recommendation to prosecutors that suspect George Zimmerman be arrested on manslaughter charges. The investigator, who was on the scene after the shooting, wrote on March 13 that the confrontation should have been avoided. That report came nearly a month before Zimmerman was arrested.

The documents, photos and video were turned over by prosecutors to defense attorneys earlier this week before they were released to the media. Among the many witness interviews were accounts by an acquaintance of Zimmerman's who said he's racist and a co-worker who said Zimmerman bullied him and mocked him with an exaggerated Middle Eastern accent.

The autopsy says medical examiners found THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, when they tested Martin's blood and urine. A police report shows Martin had been shot once in the chest and had been pronounced dead at the scene.

Also in the package is a photo showing Zimmerman with a bloody nose on the night of the fight. A paramedic report says Zimmerman had a 1-inch laceration on his head and forehead abrasion.

"Bleeding tenderness to his nose, and a small laceration to the back of his head. All injuries have minor bleeding," paramedic Michael Brandy wrote about Zimmerman's injuries in the report.

Whether Zimmerman was injured in the Feb. 26 altercation with Martin has been a key question. Zimmerman has claimed self-defense and said he only fired because the unarmed teenager attacked him.

Zimmerman was not arrested for weeks because he invoked Florida's "stand-your-ground" law, which does not require a person to retreat in the face of a serious threat. He was released on bail and is in hiding while he awaits trial on a second-degree murder charge. He has pleaded not guilty.

The investigator who called for Zimmerman's arrest, Christopher Serino, told prosecutors in March that the fight could have been avoided if Zimmerman had remained in his vehicle and awaited the arrival of law enforcement. He said Zimmerman, after leaving his vehicle, could have identified himself to Martin as a concerned citizen and talked to him instead of confronting him.

He said there is no evidence Martin was involved in any criminal activity.

The lawyer for Martin's parents seized on the investigator's recommendation.

"The police concluded that none of this would have happened if George Zimmerman hadn't gotten out of his car," said attorney Ben Crump. "If George Zimmerman hadn't gotten out of his car, they say it was completely avoidable. That is the headline."

A separate report written by Serino at the crime scene says Martin had $40.15, Skittles candy, a red lighter, headphones and a photo pin in his pocket. A single 9mm shell casing was found near Martin's body.

New witness accounts also emerged Thursday. A witness, whose name is redacted, told investigators he saw "a black male, wearing a dark colored hoodie," on top of a white or Hispanic male who was yelling for help.

The witness, who was looking out the sliding glass door at his home about 30 feet away, said he saw the black male throwing punches "MMA (mixed martial arts) style."

He said he told the fighters he was calling the police. He said that as he was making the call, he heard a shot. He looked outside and saw the person who had been on top laid out on the grass as if he had been shot. He said the other fighter was standing on the sidewalk, talking to another person with a flashlight.

The case has become a national racial flashpoint because the Martin family and supporters contend Zimmerman singled Martin out because he was black.

Another police report says that on four occasions between last August and Feb. 2, Zimmerman called police to report young black males acting suspiciously in his neighborhood. He never called about anyone of another race.

Two acquaintances paint an unflattering picture of Zimmerman in police interviews.

A distraught woman tells an investigator that she stays away from Zimmerman because he's racist and because of things he's done to her in the past, but she didn't elaborate on what happened between them.

"I don't at all know who this kid was or anything else. But I know George, and I know that he does not like black people. He would start something. He's very confrontational. It's in his blood. We'll just say that," the unidentified woman says in an audio recording.

A man whose name was deleted from the audio told investigators said he worked with Zimmerman in 2008 for a few months. It wasn't clear which company it was.

The man, who described his heritage as "Middle Eastern," said that when he first started many employees didn't like him. Zimmerman seized on this, the employee said, and bullied him.

Zimmerman wanted to "get in" with the clique at work so he exaggerated a Middle Eastern accent when talking about the employee, the man said. The employee told investigators that Zimmerman made reference to terrorists and bombings when talking about him.

"It was so immature," said the employee, who ended up writing a letter to management about Zimmerman.

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SANFORD, Fla. - by WKMG Staff

The full evidence in the case against George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watchman who shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in February has been released on Thursday.

The state attorney's office released the evidence, which is 183 pages, including photos and recordings.

Local 6 investigative reporter Tony Pipitone will go through the information and provide updates as we get them. Findings in the report to note thus far are:

* A picture of Zimmerman appearing to have a broken nose, which is detailed in the report.
* Autopsy report: Martin had THC in his system the night of the shooting.
* FBI audio analysis: Addresses whether Zimmerman said a racial slur or not.
* Sanford Police Department's Capias request: Sanford police investigator wrote, "Zimmerman can be heard in the background crying for help." The investigator also writes that "the encounter between George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin was ultimately avoidable by Zimmerman if Zimmerman had remained in his vehicle and awaited the arrival of the law enforcement." The investigator also said Zimmerman could have identified himself to Martin as a "concerned citizen."
* Trayvon Martin's girlfriend, who was on the phone with Martin, said she heard Trayvon Martin say "Get off, get off" and then the phone went dead.

Zimmerman fatally shot Martin last February during a confrontation in a gated community of townhomes in Sanford. Martin was walking home from a 7-Eleven store and Zimmerman called police to report him as suspicious.

Zimmerman has claimed self-defense and has entered a not guilty plea.

The lack of an arrest in Martin's death for 44 days inspired protests nationwide.

Note: Attached is a witness list for the George Zimmerman case

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New Details on Trayvon Martin Shooting
By Mark Straussman

(CBS News) SANFORD, Fla., - The trial of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer charged with murdering Trayvon Martin is still months away, but the investigation continues.

CBS News correspondent Mark Strassmann has come up with new information about what happened that February night when Zimmerman shot the unarmed teenager in a gated community in Sanford, Florida.

At the heart of this case is what happened of the course of 90 seconds: from the moment Zimmerman hung up with a non-emergency dispatcher -- to the first 911 call from a neighbor.

Wednesday new details emerged from sources close to the investigation. A responder at the crime scene told CBS News that he and others saw wounds on the knuckles of one of Martin's hands as he lay dead on this lawn, suggesting Martin had thrown a punch.

Zimmerman told police he fired the shot at point blank range while on his back, as the 17-year-old straddled him.

He also told investigators Martin did not die immediately but mumbled either "it's over" or "you got me."

Special prosecutor Angela Corey's team has built a murder case against Zimmerman on evidence not available to the original state attorney or Sanford police - information that includes the autopsy report on Martin.

State crime lab analysis of his clothes, including gun powder residue that could indicate the distance between of the men.

Cell phone records from Zimmerman that include text messages he sent up to one month after the shooting

There are also two surveillance videos, one from the 7-11 where Martin bought Skittles and an ice tea, the other from the clubhouse in the gated subdivision where Zimmerman shot him.

The special prosecutor's case also includes Zimmerman's medical report the day after the shooting. It listed a broken nose, two black eyes and a cut in the back of the head.

A source also told CBS News an unreleased police report noted Zimmerman's sweatshirt had "grass stains, and was wet on the back."

Details from Trayvon Martin's autopsy show the bullet entered the left side of his chest, and shattered the ventrical, one of his heart's two large chambers but the round did not leave his body.

The reports also noted the fatal wound's surrounded by a two-by-two inch pattern called stippling, caused by gunpower burns. It suggests Zimmerman fired inches away from the teenager.

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UPDATE Orlando, FL (AP) -- May 17, 2012 --

Prosecutors have released evidence in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin and one photograph shows George Zimmerman with a bloody nose

The evidence was released Thursday. One photo shows Zimmerman with blood under his nose. A paramedic report says Zimmerman also had a 1-inch laceration on his head and forehead abrasion.

The Florida neighborhood watch volunteer who is awaiting trial on a second-degree murder charge in the shooting of Martin.

Zimmerman is charged with killing the unarmed 17-year-old during a confrontation last February.

He has pleaded not guilty, claiming self-defense.

CBS News correspondent Mark Strassmann reported Wednesday of new details in the case from sources close to the investigation.

Zimmerman: Martin's last words were "it's over"

A responder at the crime scene told CBS News that he and others saw wounds on the knuckles of one of Martin's hands as he lay dead on this lawn, suggesting Martin had thrown a punch.

Zimmerman told police he fired the shot at point blank range while on his back, as the 17-year-old straddled him.

He also told investigators Martin did not die immediately but mumbled either "it's over" or "you got me."

The special prosecutor's case also includes Zimmerman's medical report the day after the shooting. It listed a broken nose, two black eyes and a cut in the back of the head.

A source also told CBS News an unreleased police report noted Zimmerman's sweatshirt had "grass stains, and was wet on the back."

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Photo: Zimmerman Bloodied After Martin Shooting
by Mike Schneider and Kyle Hightower, AP

Orlando, FL (AP) - May 17, 2012 --

Prosecutors have released evidence in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin and one photograph shows George Zimmerman with a bloody nose

The evidence was released Thursday. One photo shows Zimmerman with blood under his nose. A paramedic report says Zimmerman also had a 1-inch laceration on his head and forehead abrasion.

The Florida neighborhood watch volunteer who is awaiting trial on a second-degree murder charge in the shooting of Martin.

Zimmerman is charged with killing the unarmed 17-year-old during a confrontation last February.

He has pleaded not guilty, claiming self-defense.

--------------------------------------------

Court Records Detail George Zimmerman's Medical Injuries

Miami, FL (AP) -- May 15, 2012 --

Court records show George Zimmerman had a pair of black eyes, a nose fracture and two cuts to the back of his head after the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

The medical records were part of evidence released Tuesday that prosecutors have in the second-degree murder case against Zimmerman. He has entered a plea of not guilty and claims self-defense in the Feb. 26 shooting. A message left Tuesday evening with Zimmerman's attorney was not immediately returned

Zimmerman was treated Feb. 27 at Altamonte Family Practice. No one answered the phone at the practice Tuesday evening.

ABC News first reported Zimmerman's injuries from the medical records. Some of the injuries were previously reported by The Associated Press based on video of Zimmerman at a jail sally port.

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George Zimmerman Appears Unscathed in Police Surveillance Video

(CBS News) SANFORD, Fla. - March 29, 2012 -

Newly-released video of the man who shot and killed Trayvon Martin shows George Zimmerman with no apparent injuries, right after he claims Martin attacked him.

That is raising new questions about Zimmerman's claim of self-defense.

But Zimmerman's father insists the unarmed teenager was the aggressor and Zimmerman had no choice but to do what he did.

The police video, obtained by ABC News, shows Zimmerman, in handcuffs, being led into Sanford police headquarters the night he killed Martin.

Video shows Zimmerman without blood, bruises
Complete coverage: The shooting of Trayvon Martin

Zimmerman shows no obvious head injuries, but at one point, an officer inspects the back of his head. Zimmerman spent five hours telling police he shot Martin in self-defense.

And in an interview with Fox 35 Orlando, Robert Zimmerman, the gunman's father, said his son told him he spotted Martin and called police to report a suspicious person, then followed him. He turned around, says Robert Zimmerman, and there was Martin.

He claims Martin then approached his son, cursing at him. As the younger Zimmerman reached for his cell phone, Martin punched him, breaking his nose and knocking him to the ground, Robert Zimmerman contends.

"Trayvon Martin got on top of him and just started beating him," claims the father.

That, says Robert Zimmerman, is when Martin threatened to kill his son. George Zimmerman pulled out his firearm and shot Martin.

No witness saw how the fight started.

On a 911 tape, someone was yelling for help before the sound of a gunshot - but it is unclear who.

"You think he's yelling help?" the police dispatcher asked.

"Yes," said the caller.

Then the gunshot is heard.

"There's gunshots!" the woman on the phone said.

"Everyone that knows George," asserts Robert Zimmerman, "knows absolutely that that is George screaming. There's no doubt in anyone's mind.

But Sybrina Fulton, Trayvon's mother, heard it differently.

Asked earlier this month if she recognized the voice on the tape, she replied, "That's my baby. That's my son that was yelling."

Two parents. Two sons. Two different takes on the voice on that tape.

The special prosecutor has told us she'll hire a voice recognition expert, hoping to find the truth.

_____________________________

ABCNews.com posted this surveillance video of George Zimmerman arriving at the police station the night he shot and killed 17-year old Trayvon Martin. The video shows the neighborhood watch volunteer getting out of a patrol car in handcuffs.

Zimmerman says he shot martin in self defense. His lawyer has said he believed Zimmerman's nose was broken and that he suffered a cut in the back of his head during the incident. The video appears to show an officer looking at the back of his head.

In another development, Martin's 16-year-old girlfriend spoke with ABC's "World News." She described a phone call she had with Martin moments before the fatal shooting.

She said he told her he was being followed. "He was walking fast. When he say this man behind him again. He come and say this look like he about to do something to him. And then Trayvon come and said the man was still behind him, then I come and say, run!"

Zimmerman's father also spoke on Wednesday. He claims Trayvon Martin attacked his son, "Trayvon Martin said something to the effect of you're going to die now or you're going to die tonight, something to that effect. He continued to beat George. At some point, George pulled his pistol and did what he did."


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