[UPDATE] Crews Recover Body of Worker Trapped in Fla. Energy Plant

By: Progress Energy Release, Associated Press
By: Progress Energy Release, Associated Press

[UPDATE] ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (June 14, 2011) – 7:21am

Rescue teams have found the body of a contract worker who was trapped Thursday night when the building in which he was working collapsed unexpectedly at the site of the Paul L. Bartow Power Plant on Weedon Island near St. Petersburg.

At approximately 11:45 p.m. on June 13, teams of rescuers recovered the body of Clark White, 65, of Moundsville, W.Va. White, a retired Army veteran, was an employee of Frontier Industrial Corp., a Buffalo, N.Y.-based company working on behalf of Progress Energy Florida to dismantle boiler structures no longer in use at the power plant site. White worked for the dismantling company for eight years.

“This was a terrible tragedy, and our thoughts and prayers continue for Clark and his family,” said Vincent Dolan, CEO and president of Progress Energy Florida. “We are especially grateful to the scores of rescue and recovery workers who worked long hours in very difficult conditions. Along with Frontier Industrial and appropriate state and federal agencies, we will be working to understand the cause of the accident.”

On Thursday evening, workers were preparing for a controlled collapse of a large boiler structure, scheduled for approximately 8:30 p.m. The structure collapsed at 7:15 p.m., with White inside. There were another 20 people – including Progress Energy Florida employees and contract company employees – working on the dismantlement at the time.

Dismantling work on the large boiler has been halted at the site. The structures were associated with the power plant’s oil-fired power generation. The company converted the site to cleaner-burning natural gas units in 2009.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- June 13, 2011 7:29am

A search continues for the body of a welder who was helping dismantle a Tampa Bay area power plant when it collapsed.

Officials say the search for 65-year-old Clark White switched to a recovery mission Sunday night. He was trapped when the Weedon Island boiler structure collapsed Thursday night. The search was scheduled to resume this morning.

White was part of a crew preparing the site for a controlled collapse.

His family says he warned the crew -- including his 31-year-old son Travis -- before the collapse occurred.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (June 10, 2011) – 10:30am -

The morning after a contract worker was trapped in an unexpected building collapse at the Progress Energy Florida’s Paul L. Bartow Power Plant, the company is continuing to provide rescue workers assistance in their efforts.

At approximately 7:15 p.m. on Thursday, June 9, a contract worker involved in the dismantlement of a building at Progress Energy Florida’s retired Paul L. Bartow Power Plant in St. Petersburg was trapped when the building he was working in collapsed unexpectedly. As of 10 a.m. Friday, the condition of the trapped employee was still unknown.

“We recognize that, in a situation like this, every minute matters,” said David Sorrick, vice president of power generation for Progress Energy Florida. “We’ve dedicated our resources to help the brave men and women involved in the rescue effort locate the trapped worker as quickly and as safely as possible.”

In addition to providing technical assistance in the rescue effort, the company is donating the use of heavy equipment to help remove debris from the site of Thursday’s building collapse.

The trapped contract worker, an employee of Buffalo, NY-based Frontier Industrial Corporation, was the only person in the building at the time of the collapse. A total of 21 Progress Energy employees and contractors were at the site when the accident occurred.

The group had been working to dismantle the plant’s retired Number 3 boiler.

At the time of the accident, the crew was preparing for a controlled collapse, which was scheduled to occur at around 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Progress Energy has been working with contractors to dismantle the Bartow steam plant following the 2009 construction of four on-site, gas/oil-fired combustion turbines and one steam turbine. Once the 1,200-megawatt (MW) combined-cycle plant came online, the use of the Bartow steam plant was no longer economically feasible.

_____________________________

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (June 10, 2011) –

At approximately 7:15 p.m. on Thursday, June 9, a contract worker involved in the dismantlement of a building at Progress Energy Florida’s retired Paul L. Bartow Power Plant in St. Petersburg was trapped when the building he was working in collapsed unexpectedly. As of 10:30 p.m., the condition of the worker was unknown.

The trapped contract worker, an employee of Buffalo, NY-based Frontier Industrial Corporation, was the only person in the building at the time of the collapse. A total of 21 Progress Energy employees and contractors were at the site when the accident occurred.

The group had been working to dismantle the plant’s retired Number 3 boiler by cutting eight of the 18, 14-inch H-beams that supported the boiler section. The boiler section was a 180-foot structure with a 10,000 square foot base, which accounted for approximately 25 percent of the overall plant structure. This was the first boiler dismantlement to be performed as part of the project.

At the time of the accident, the crew was preparing for a controlled collapse, which was scheduled to occur at around 8:30 p.m. this evening.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the gentleman trapped in this terrible accident and his family,” said David Sorrick, vice president of power generation for Progress Energy Florida. “At this time we are solely focused on assisting first responders in their rescue effort.”

Progress Energy has been working with contractors to dismantle the Bartow steam plant following the 2009 construction of four on-site, gas/oil-fired combustion turbines and one steam turbine. Once the 1,200-megawatt (MW) combined-cycle plant came online, the use of the Bartow steam plant was no longer economically feasible


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
WCTV 1801 Halstead Blvd. Tallahassee, FL 32309
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 123609434 - wctv.tv/a?a=123609434
Gray Television, Inc.