Logging Truck, Multiple Vehicles Collide in Brooks County

By: Eyewitness News Email
By: Eyewitness News Email

[Update] - Brooks County, Georgia - January 6, 2012 -

The dense fog Friday morning is being blamed for a nasty wreck in Brooks County, Georgia, just north of Morven.
The accident snared traffic and sent five people to the hospital.

The usually quiet road became the explosive scene of the morning crash.
Dense fog caused a minivan to slam into a log truck crossing the intersection at State Roads 122 and 133.
As they sat there, a Ford Focus then barreled right in to them only moments later.
The Georgia State Patrol says the log truck driver, Tony Fowler, is being charged with the first crash for failing to yield the right away after stopping at a stop sign.
But the driver of the Ford Focus, Victor Sanchez-Peres, is charged with driving too fast for the conditions and driving without a license.

Five people have been taken to local hospitals.
The driver of the minivan in the initial wreck, and then four occupants of the Ford Focus that followed.
The Georgia State Patrol says their conditions range from minor to serious, but there's nothing life threatening.

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Brooks County, Georgia - January 6, 2012 -

A nasty wreck in Brooks County snared traffic and sent five people to the hospital Friday.
A Brooks County Sheriff's Deputy told Eyewitness News that earlier this morning the fog was so thick you could barely see your hand in front of your face.

The Georgia State Patrol says a log truck was at the intersection of State Road 122 and State Road 133 when a minivan slammed into it. As they sat in the intersection, moments later another car collided with the truck from the opposite side.

The trooper says the five occupants of the two vehicles were pinned under the truck until help could arrive.
Another semi-truck nearly barreled into the scene, but skidded to a grinding hault just in the nick of time.

The Sheriff's Office says traffic this morning was backed up for miles.
There is no word yet on who was at fault in the accident.


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  • by guese 101 Location: n,a on Jan 7, 2012 at 07:17 AM
    Maybe yall just need to get use to us being on the road who every stop in front of the driver well get the ticket not tye driver they have to make a living to yes they have every right to use that road to just as much as yall do cut him so slack and back off because there pass a law against yalll so have fun
    • reply
      by ???? on Jan 13, 2012 at 05:50 AM in reply to guese 101
      Ever heard of punctuation?
  • by John on Jan 7, 2012 at 06:15 AM
    Once as I truck driver I got off-of the road in a heavy fog in Kentucky. Once it lifted, I passed several miles of carnage and destruction, so I was glad I did.
  • by Dogman Location: Madison,FL on Jan 6, 2012 at 11:11 PM
    I'm a trucker that was a logger and also a wrecker driver in Brooks co. I've seen a lot . Seems like anymore a trucker is always at fault no matter what happens . In low visible weather ALL need to slow down and use more caution . Our loads must go many times we would love to not be on the road but it's our job to be . It takes time to get a truck up to speed and cars seem to play on that . If the visibility was that bad the road should have been closed the ockefenokee swamp fires are test of proper highway management
  • by Tiffany on Jan 6, 2012 at 07:46 PM
    Horrible accident but thankful all are well. Thanks to the nurse that immediatelly started to help before all other EMTs arrived. I agree with the previous statement, it was smoke not fog. I sat there for an hour and when I got to work smelled like a fire pit. LITERALLY 0 visibility at one point
    before I arrived at the scene. I was the second car behind the log truck. Thanks also to the firefighters and EMT's. Great job
  • by Eric Location: Whigham on Jan 6, 2012 at 07:03 PM
    When its foggy use your headlights log trucks have lights and flags on them so they can be seen and if you cant see that you dont need to be driving
  • by Brandy Location: hwy 122w on Jan 6, 2012 at 06:26 PM
    I've lived on this hwy all my life. There have been many wrecks at that intersection and at 122 and 333. I believe to minimize wrecks in the area the county should make both intersections a 4 way stop. If it was smoke from a controlled burn the day before, they are supposed to set out thick smoke signs like the plantations do. I know this because I have lived on one of the plantations all my life. We had thick smoke a couple years back and the state patrol had to guide traffic through from the Sandhill store to the 122 & 333 intersection.
    • reply
      by Randy on Jan 6, 2012 at 08:18 PM in reply to Brandy
      A 4 way stop would not have prevented this accident, I live near 333 & 122, east & west has a stop sign and the stupid people slow down and run that stop sign all the time.The smoke/fog was very bad this morning I could not see the stop sign but I knew it was there. Someone new would have run right thru it, slow down and be more careful when it raining or foggy, common sense seems to be lost when there is a change in the weather or driving conditions. And yes there are plenty of wrecks at both Hwy 133 & Hwy 333 crossing Hwy 122. Most using poor judgement, many lives lost at both.
  • by t Location: brooks county on Jan 6, 2012 at 05:32 PM
    i happen to know this area very well myself, and it just so happens that people are wrecking here all the time!! And yes there was a controlled burn there, but it was also very very very foggy cuz i was out @ 7:20 taking my daughter to school!!! so i wouldnt go blaming the controlled burners, when nature is just as much at fault!!!!
  • by cathy Location: brooks on Jan 6, 2012 at 03:14 PM
    The article is incorrect stating that it was foggy. It was not. There was thick smoke in the area due to a contolled burn from the previous day. The truck was crossing the highway when the vehicles slid under the trailer. The smoke was so thick you could not see but a car length in front of you. How do I know this, because I live near the accident site!!
  • by bama on Jan 6, 2012 at 01:24 PM
    why were there a log truck on the roads? Why were any boddy on the roads this morning to get to work a nd pay there bills log truck drivers are the same way most of them get payed by the load not by the hour so they have to ready work for there money.
  • by dAVID Location: BROOKS on Jan 6, 2012 at 10:47 AM
    I KNOW THEY ARE ENTTIELD TO TEH ROAD AS MUCH AS ANYONE BUT WHY WOULD A LOG TRUCK DRIVER BE ON THE ROAD IN SUCH DANGEROUS CONDITIONS? THIS MAKES NO SENSE.
    • reply
      by J on Jan 6, 2012 at 11:17 AM in reply to dAVID
      They are entitled to the road, just as much as both vehicles that hit it. I think that people need to slow down even more and if they know where they and are near intersections need to be even more carefull.
      • reply
        by Beverly on Jan 6, 2012 at 12:34 PM in reply to J
        @ David: Really!!! What would a log truck be doing on the road. Maybe going to drop the load he was carrying to the mill. That is how truck drivers make their money. My husband is up at 4am and in the woods by 5am to start the day which ends at around 8pm at nite. Last I checked most mills open at 6am except for the ones that are open all nite. David pls think about what you just said!!!! b/c it makes no sense!!!
      • reply
        by Anonymous on Jan 6, 2012 at 01:09 PM in reply to J
        Perhaps he needed to work. No miles equals no pay. So it does make sense.
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