Three Dead, 170 Injured in Boston Marathon Blasts

By: Boston Athletic Association; Associated Press Email
By: Boston Athletic Association; Associated Press Email
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Associated Press Release
By JAY LINDSAY and EILEEN SULLIVAN

BOSTON (AP) -- The bombs that ripped through the crowd at the Boston Marathon, killing three people and wounding more than 170, were fashioned out of pressure cookers and packed with shards of metal, nails and ball bearings to inflict maximum carnage, a person briefed on the investigation said Tuesday.

The details on the apparently crude but deadly explosives emerged as investigators appealed to the public for amateur video and photos that might yield clues. The chief FBI agent in Boston vowed "we will go to the ends of the Earth" to find those responsible.

A person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still going on said the explosives were put in 6-liter kitchen pressure cookers, hidden in black duffel bags and left on the ground. They were packed with shrapnel, the person said.

The person said law enforcement officials have some of the bomb components but do not yet know what was used to set off the explosives.

A doctor treating the wounded appeared to corroborate the person's account, saying one of the victims was maimed by what looked like ball bearings or BBs. Doctors also said they removed a host of sharp objects from the victims, including nails that were sticking out of one little girl's body.

At the White House, meanwhile, President Barack Obama said that the bombings were an act of terrorism but that investigators do not know if they were carried out by an international organization, a domestic group or a "malevolent individual."

He added: "The American people refuse to be terrorized."

Across the U.S., from Washington to Los Angeles, police stepped up security, monitoring landmarks, government buildings, transit hubs and sporting events. Security was especially tight in Boston, with bomb-sniffing dogs checking Amtrak passengers' luggage at South Station and transit police patrolling with rifles.

"They can give me a cavity search right now and I'd be perfectly happy," said Daniel Wood, a video producer from New York City who was waiting for a train.

Similar pressure-cooker explosives have been used in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, according to a July 2010 intelligence report by the FBI and Homeland Security. Also, one of the three devices used in the May 2010 Times Square attempted bombing was a pressure cooker, the report said.

"Placed carefully, such devices provide little or no indication of an impending attack," the report said.

The Pakistani Taliban, which claimed responsibility for the 2010 attempt in Times Square, has denied any role in the Boston Marathon attack.

The two bombs blew up about 10 seconds and around 100 yards apart Monday near the finish line of the 26.2-mile race, tearing off limbs, knocking people off their feet and leaving the streets stained with blood and strewn with broken glass. The dead included an 8-year-old boy.

"We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated," said Roupen Bastajian, a state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., who had just finished the race when he heard the explosions.

Federal investigators said no one had claimed responsibility for the bombings, which took place at the world's best-known distance race, held every year on one of Boston's biggest holidays, Patriots' Day.

"We will go to the ends of the Earth to identify the subject or subjects who are responsible for this despicable crime, and we will do everything we can to bring them to justice," said Richard DesLauriers, FBI agent in charge in Boston.

He said investigators had received "voluminous tips" and were interviewing witnesses and analyzing the crime scene.

Gov. Deval Patrick said that contrary to earlier reports, no unexploded bombs were found.

FBI agents searched an apartment in the Boston suburb of Revere overnight, and investigators were seen leaving with brown paper bags, plastic trash bags and a duffel bag. But it was unclear whether the tenant had anything to do with the attack.

A law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to release details of the investigation said the man had been tackled by a bystander, then police, as he ran from the scene of the explosions.

But the official said it is possible the man was simply running away to protect himself from the blast, as many others did.

At a news conference, police and federal agents repeatedly appealed for any video, audio and photos taken by marathon spectators, even images that people might not think are significant.

"There has to be hundreds, if not thousands, of photos and videos" that might help investigators, state police Col. Timothy Alben said.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis said investigators also gathered a large number of surveillance tapes from businesses in the area and intend to go through the videos frame by frame.

"This is probably one of the most photographed areas in the country yesterday," he said.

At least 17 people were critically injured, police said. At least eight children were being treated at hospitals. In addition to losing limbs, victims suffered broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.

Dr. Stephen Epstein of the emergency medicine department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center said he saw an X-ray of one victim's leg that had "what appears to be small, uniform, round objects throughout it -- similar in the appearance to BBs."

Eight-year-old Martin Richard was among the dead, said U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch, a family friend. The boy's mother, Denise, and 6-year-old sister, Jane, were badly injured. His brother and father were also watching the race but were not hurt.

A candle burned on the stoop of the family's single-family home in the city's Dorchester section Tuesday, and the word "Peace" was written in chalk on the front walk.

Neighbor Betty Delorey said Martin loved to climb neighborhood trees and hop the fence outside his home.

About 23,000 runners participated in this year's Boston Marathon. Nearly two-thirds of them had crossed the finish line by the time the bombs exploded, but thousands more were still completing the course.

The attack may have been timed for maximum bloodshed: The four-hour mark is typically a crowded time near the finish line because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners completing the race and because of all the friends and relatives clustered around to cheer them on.

Davis, the police commissioner, said authorities had received "no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen" at the race. On Tuesday, he said that two security sweeps of the route had been conducted beforehand.

Patriots' Day commemorates the opening shots of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775.

Richard Barrett, the former U.N. coordinator for an al-Qaida and Taliban monitoring team who has also worked for British intelligence, said the relatively small size of the devices in Boston and the timing of the blasts suggest a domestic attack rather than an al-Qaida-inspired one.

"This happened on Patriots' Day -- it is also the day Americans are supposed to have their taxes in -- and Boston is quite a symbolic city," said Barrett, now senior director at the Qatar International Academy for Security Studies.

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Eileen Sullivan contributed to this story from Washington. Associated Press writers Jay Lindsay, Denise Lavoie, Steve LeBlanc, Bridget Murphy, Rodrique Ngowi and Meghan Barr in Boston; Julie Pace and Lara Jakes in Washington; Paisley Dodds in London and Marilynn Marchione in Milwaukee also contributed.


Associated Press Release
By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) -- Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says no unexploded bombs were found at the Boston Marathon. He says the only explosives were the ones that went off Monday.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 150 injured by two explosions just seconds apart near the finish line.

Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers says there are no known additional threats and agents are following a number of leads.

ATF agent Gene Marquez says authorities are looking for amateur video and photographic evidence that can give clues to who set off the bombs.


Associated Press Release

REVERE, Mass. (AP) -- Police have been seen carrying several large bags from a suburban Boston apartment that authorities say was searched in connection to the Boston Marathon bombing.

Boston area television stations are reporting that the bags were removed from an apartment in Revere, Mass., just north of Boston at about 2 a.m.

Police did not disclose what was in them and calls to federal and state authorities were not immediately returned.

Massachusetts State Police confirm that a search warrant was served Monday night but have provided no further details.

The Revere Fire Department wrote on its Facebook page that firefighters responded to the scene for a search for "a person of interest."

The FBI is leading the investigation into the explosions, which killed three people and injured more than 140.


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- Police say at least three people have been killed in the explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Police commissioner Ed Davis confirmed the three deaths but provided no details.

The explosions Monday also injured more than 130 people, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet.

Some of the victims lost arms and legs. Other injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- Authorities say bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon have killed two people and injured more than 120.

Eight hospitals report that they are treating at least 124 people. Of those, at least 15 are in critical condition.

The injuries ranged from cuts and bruises to amputations. Many victims suffered lower leg injuries and shrapnel wounds. Some suffered ruptured eardrums.

Dr. Richard Wolfe, chief of the department of emergency medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, says one or two of the hospital's 21 patients faced a "high probability of mortality."


Associated Press Release

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Navy has sent one of its bomb-disposal units to Boston to assist local authorities as needed in the aftermath of the two explosions near the Boston Marathon's finish line. The blasts killed two and injured more than 100.

The three-member explosive ordnance disposal team based at Naval Station Newport, R.I., was sent to Massachusetts after state officials asked for help. Authorities are investigating the bombings and also are checking other bags and packages that may have been left unattended as terrified crowds races away from the chaos Monday.

The Pentagon said no other active duty military personnel had yet been sent to the scene, although state National Guard troops were there. The Defense Department has not raised the threat level across the nation's military installations.


Tweet: CNN Breaking News @CNNNewssource

Casualty update: At least 90 people were hurt in #Boston Marathon terror attack.


According to the Boston Athletic Association Website:

There were 18 Tallahassee runners listed on the Boston Athletic Association website as running in the marathon.

17 crossed the finish line and completed the race; one did not go and is still in Tallahassee.

All additional the additional runners in our area, from Cairo, Monticello, Valdosta and Bainbridge, have been reported as completing the race, and unharmed

Please stay with WCTV Eyewitness News on air and web for the latest on this #breaking news event.


Tweet: CBS News @CBSNews

MARATHON: RT @wcbs880 Families looking for loved ones should call 617-635-4500. Anyone with info about explosions should call 1800-494-TIPS


CNN News Copy
Update, 5:15 p.m.


  • Two dead in bomb blasts near finish line of Boston Marathon, Boston police say. Area hospitals say 49 injured.

  • Two explosions happened at about 2:50 p.m., more than two hours after the first of the race's nearly 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line.

  • Third blast later reported at JFK Library about 5 miles away, police say. Not clear whether that blast is connected to first two.

  • Race called off; Red Cross website established to help people find loved ones in the area


Associated Press News Alert

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Intelligence official: 2 more explosive devices found at Boston Marathon; being dismantled.


Tweet: Boston Police Dept. Verified account
@Boston_Police

Boston Police Dept. ‏@Boston_Police 3m

28 injured. 2 dead #tweetfromthebeat via @CherylFiandaca

The Boston Marathon Facebook Page

Boston Marathon Twitter Page
@bostonmarathon

There were two bombs that exploded near the finish line in today's Boston Marathon. We are working with law enforcement to understand what exactly has happened.


If you have a friend or loved one who raced in the Boston Marathon today, let us know by email at news@wctv.tv

Twitter: @WCTV #BostonMarathon


Press Release: Boston Athletic Association
http://www.baa.org/individual.html

Runners From Tallahassee, FL

Cox, Kristine
Cox, T. Alan
Devlieger, Terry 'Tj'
Emo, Warren
Godin, Eric
Griffin, Gary
Guillen, Antonio
Hudson, Sean
Kiros, Gebre-Egziabher
Lake, Chris
McDermott, Jack
Mitchell, Scott
Peymann, Michael
Piekarewicz, Adriana
Silvanima, Jay
Stedman, Nancy
Steverson, Alex

Runners from Valdosta

Moore, Yvette
Scruggs, April

Runners from Bainbridge

Hufstetler, Christian

Runners from Cairo

Ansley, Shelton

Runners from Monticello

McDaniel, Jerry


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- Spectators and runners are describing the twin explosions that shook the finish line of the Boston Marathon today.

One woman says she was waiting for her husband to cross the finish line, and, in her words, "it just blew." She described it as "a loud boom, and then glass everywhere." Cherie Falgoust says something hit her head, and she "just ducked."

A runner, Laura McLean of Toronto, says she heard two explosions outside the medical tent. She says, "There are people who are really, really bloody." McLean says, "they were pulling them into the medical tent."

The explosions took place about three hours after the winners crossed the finish line. The second one could be heard a few seconds after the first one.

A runner said, "There are a lot of people down."

Marathon workers were seen carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg.


Associated Press Release

By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) -- Two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon have resulted in injuries.

Bloody spectators were being carried Monday to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. Police wove through competitors as they ran back toward the course.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.


Associated Press Release

BOSTON (AP) -- Authorities are investigating a report of two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

There were two booms heard from near the finish line inside the Fairmount Copley Plaza Hotel.

Race officials locked down the hotel because of the report.

The sound of two booms, which sounded like thunder, had come a short time earlier.


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