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Leon County Humane Society takes in dozens of animals from Hurricane Ida

Many of those animals are staying with foster volunteers, but LCHS staff say area shelters are...
Many of those animals are staying with foster volunteers, but LCHS staff say area shelters are already full.(WCTV)
Published: Sep. 12, 2021 at 10:16 PM EDT
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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -The Leon County Humane Society is stepping up to save lives and find animals new homes.

The humane society has taken in more than 40 animals from shelters impacted by Hurricane Ida.

Many of those animals are staying with foster volunteers, but LCHS staff say area shelters are already full.

“The only spaces that we have for dogs are in homes, so if we don’t have homes we don’t have spaces,” said Mallory Davis.

Davis has been fostering dogs for seven years, helping to provide a temporary home for more than 50 dogs.

Right now she’s taking care of Blackberry, a sweet dog who likes to be right by her side.

Davis says she started fostering after her own dog passed away. Now, she continues to do so to help give back, and potentially save lives of shelter dogs.

“Just knowing that we can be an advocate, and we can help where there’s a need for it,” Davis said. “All of these dogs, they weren’t dogs that were fond during the hurricane. They were dogs that were already in the shelters, so we’re really clearing out those shelters so that they have space for the dogs that are currently lost.”

LCHS took in 26 dogs and 16 cats from Louisiana, all looking for new homes after the storm.

“Every time hurricane season gears up we just start prepping,” said Executive Director Lisa Glunt. “Prepping ourselves so even if a storm doesn’t directly impact our community we have the ability to help out.”

Glunt says most shelters are already full. It’s a busy time of year made even more challenging because of the pandemic.

“Everyone is overwhelmed. This is always the worst time of year, it’s summer, it’s when there’s kittens all over the place,” Glunt said. “We’ve got dogs and cats that are not altered that are out breeding.”

Glunt added that many vet offices were forced to cut back on services because of COVID, and Trap-Neuter-Release programs were also put on hold.

It’s why, she says, the help of volunteers and fosters is more important than ever.

LCHS was also able to send back three loads of food back to Louisiana to further support the shelters in need.

All the animals are currently receiving medical checks and services, and are expected to be ready for adoption in the coming weeks.

More information about getting involved can be found on the LCHS website.

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