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Earth was at its closest point to the sun Tuesday

The Earth was closest to the sun, Perihelion, early Tuesday morning. The Earth's orbit around...
The Earth was closest to the sun, Perihelion, early Tuesday morning. The Earth's orbit around the sun isn't quite a circle, and one end of the orbit is closer to the sun than the Aphelion, which is usually in the Northern Hemisphere summer.(Charles Roop / WCTV Pinpoint Weather)
Published: Jan. 4, 2022 at 6:03 PM EST
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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - It may sound strange, especially since that it’s winter time in the Big Bend and South Georgia, but the Earth was at its closest point from the Sun early Tuesday morning.

The Earth’s closest location to the sun in its orbit around the Sun, known as perihelion, was at 1:52 a.m. ET, according to EarthSky.

The orbit, like many other planets, is elliptical and similar to an oval, according to NASA. This movement put the Earth nearly 3% closer to the sun than when the Earth is at its farthest from the sun, or its aphelion. The farthest mark is expected to be on July 4. The average distance between the Earth and the Sun is 93 million miles.

Despite the third rock from the sun being at its closest point, it’s not a driver of the seasons. The earth’s 23.5-degree tilt on its axis is the reason for the seasons. But the oval-shaped orbit does have an impact on the length of the seasons. When the Earth is farthest from the sun, the planet will move slower thanks to the laws of planetary motion, according to Space.com. The Northern Hemisphere’s winter is about five days shorter than summer.

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