Michael now post-tropical as it moves out to sea

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By: WCTV Eyewitness News
October 12, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Michael was downgraded to post-tropical after impacting areas from Florida's Gulf Coast to New England.

Post-Tropical Cyclone Michael was located 185 miles east-northeast of Norfolk, Va. as of the 5 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center. Maximum sustained winds were at 65 mph, but likely away from the center of the low.

The storm was moving quickly toward the east-northeast at 29 mph. It's expected to keep that general track and move across the northern Atlantic Ocean.

The NHC deemed the low extratropical, meaning that the storm has lost its warm-core tropical characteristics. Strong winds and flooding remained a concern for parts of the New England coastline as the remnants moved through the region Friday morning.


By: WCTV Eyewitness News
October 11, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- As of the 2 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Tropical Storm Michael had maximum sustained winds of 50 miles per hour.

The storm is located 25 miles south of Greensboro, North Carolina and is moving NE at 23 mph.


11 a.m.

Michael has moved out of our area and has now been downgraded to a tropical storm.

As of the 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Michael had maximum sustained winds of 50 miles per hour. The storm is located 35 miles SSE of Charlotte, North Carolina and is moving NE at 23 mph.


By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 10, 2018
11:00 p.m

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Hurricane Michael continued to move away from the Big Bend and South Georgia Wednesday night while decreasing in strength.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to 75 mph according to the 11 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The minimum central pressure continues to increase and was at 970 millibars. The storm was rapidly moving northeast at 20 mph.

Conditions will continue to improve Wednesday night into Thursday morning in the viewing area. The southern-most bands were near places like Moultrie and Adel, with a weak rain band from near Jasper southwest to near Steinhatchee. The bands will continue to move northeasterly with the storm.

Lows tonight will be back into the 70s with a mostly cloudy sky with breezy conditions. Some locations Wednesday night could still see some tropical-storm-force gusts. But winds will begin to subside Monday (out of the west at 8 to 15 mph) with highs back into the upper 80s to near 90.


By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 10, 2018
5:00 p.m

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Hurricane Michael's maximum sustained winds continue to decrease after after making landfall Wednesday afternoon, but it still remains a potent hurricane.

The 5 p.m. EDT advisory from the National Hurricane Center noted maximum sustained winds of 125 mph with a minimum central pressure of 932 millibars. The Pinpoint Weather Team has not seen any reports of sustained winds speeds at that strength as of this update. Michael was moving north-northeastward at 16 mph. Satellite and radar imagery showed the storm nearly halfway between Marianna, Fla. and Donalsonville, Ga.

Satellite imagery has shown warming of the cloud tops near the center of circulation, along with a collapsing eye. This is a sign of some "weakening" as the center of the storm becomes removed from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

Michael is expected to continue a north-northeast to northeasterly trek in the near term as a trough of low pressure and a cold front to the west will be steering this tropical cyclone.

The strongest winds will be over southwestern Georgia. Wind speeds of tropical-storm to hurricane-force are possible. Tropical-storm-force winds are expected for the Big Bend and South-Central Georgia - especially with some of the outer bands.

By: WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 10, 2018
2:00 p.m

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Hurricane Michael made landfall just northwest of Mexico Beach with winds of 155 mph.
The minimum central pressure at landfall was 919 millibars.

As of 2 PM, Michael continues to move onshore. Hurricane-force winds are possible in Gulf, Bay, Franklin, Calhoun, and Jackson county.

Even away from the eyewall of Michael, winds can range between 40 and 60 mph is several spots this afternoon.



By: WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 10, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- The latest on Hurricane Michael:

11 a.m.

The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph. The storm is located about 60 miles SSW of Panama City, moving NNE at 14 mph.

As the storm approached the Panhandle Wednesday morning, the minimum central pressure continued to fall. Reports show a recent Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance reading of a minimum central pressure of 919.9 millibars.


Conditions will continue to deteriorate over the Big Bend and South Georgia during the afternoon and evening. Southwest Georgia and the western Big Bend could see at least hurricane-force gusts with tropical-storm-force sustained winds likely. The eastern Big Bend and Central Georgia will likely see tropical-storm-force winds.

Storm surge along the coast remains a dangerous threat. A tornado watch also remains in effect until 5 p.m.

WCTV has wall-to-wall coverage as Hurricane Michael nears the region. You can watch live on our Facebook page here.


8 a.m.

The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph. The storm is located about 90 miles SW of Panama City, moving north at 13 mph.

Its center is about 76 miles SW of Apalachicola, Florida.

Rain bands from Michael are already moving through the Big Bend and South Georgia. Expect conditions to continue to deteriorate through the afternoon.

There hasn't been change to the forecast path of the storm. Landfall is expected between noon and 2 pm eastern time.
After landfall, it is expected to increase in forward motion, pushing northeast. Conditions are expected to improve Thursday.


2 a.m.

The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 130 mph. The storm is located about 180 miles SSW of Panama City, moving north at 12 mph.

Satellite imagery is showing Michael's eye wobbling a bit. However, the forecast path remains the same. Landfall is projected to be somewhere west of Apalachicola around Wednesday afternoon. It is forecast to weaken after landfall. By Wednesday night, winds should be significantly weaker around 85 mph near the center of the storm.

Hurricane force winds extend 45 miles away from Michael's center. Tropical storm-force winds extend 175 miles from its center. Tropical storm-force winds of 39-74 mph are possible throughout the entire North Florida and South Georgia viewing area.

Local threats remain the same. Coastal flooding and a 4 to 10 foot storm surge is possible. So far, storm surge will likely be most severe between Mexico Beach and Keaton Beach. Isolated spin-up tornadoes are possible as Michael's rain bands move ashore.

Inland areas could get heavy rain. Flash flooding is possible, mainly in our western counties.


By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 9, 2018 - 11 p.m. EDT

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Hurricane Michael continued to strengthen as Hurricane Hunters found a dropping central barometric pressure near the center of the storm Tuesday night.

The 11 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center reported maximum sustained winds of 125 mph with a minimum central pressure of 947 millibars. The hurricane was still moving north at 12 mph.

Convection near the center became more symmetrical earlier Tuesday evening. The structure still looks similar, but the deep convection decreased a little bit on the southeastern side. Hurricane Hunters did find drier air to the immediate west of Michael. Still, they found the central pressure continuing to drop throughout the evening.

The forecast path remains the same as landfall in or near Panama City looks more likely. After landfall, Michael will continue a northeasterly path through South Georgia potentially as a minimal hurricane.

The official forecast does have Michael becoming a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale by Wednesday morning. The NHC noted in their discussion that continued strengthening is likely until landfall.

Hurricane-force winds can be expected in our western areas, and in parts of South Georgia. Tropical-storm-force winds are likely across our viewing area.

Storm surge continues to be a concern. Surge of 8 to 12 feet remains possible along the Big Bend coastline.

Conditions will begin to deteriorate starting Wednesday as the outer rain bands make it to the coast first, and then make their way inland.


By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 9, 2018 - 8 p.m. EDT

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Hurricane Michael remains a major hurricane, according to the 8 p.m. EDT advisory from the National Hurricane Center.

The intermediate advisory had the center of Michael 255 miles south of Panama City. It was moving north at 12 mph. The minimum central pressure has been falling this evening, and was at 953 millibars as of that advisory.

The official forecast from the NHC maintains the thought of it remaining a category three hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale maximum sustained winds of 125 mph.

Local impacts to the Big Bend and South Georgia will remain to be wind, storm surge, inland flooding due to heavy rain, and a chance for tornadoes. Winds are expected to be tropical-storm-force for much of of our area with a chance to see hurricane-force sustained in our western areas. Hurricane-force gusts are possible in our western areas and over South Georgia. Storm surge of 8-12 is expected along the Big Bend coastline.


By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
October 9, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) – Hurricane Michael was strengthening as the storm aimed for the Florida panhandle Tuesday evening.

Michael was located 270 miles south-southwest of Apalachicola as it was moving northerly at 12 mph as of the 5 p.m. EDT advisory from the National Hurricane Center. Maximum sustained were have increased to 120 mph with a minimum central pressure of 957 mb.

The storm continued to show signs of organization as deep convection develops on the northern side, and on the eastern side. The storm showed an eye on visible satellite imagery, but has since lost it.

Hurricane Hunters were flying through Michael Tuesday evening. The most recent data showed the highest winds on the southeastern corner where some of the deepest convection was located.

The environment remains conducive for additional strengthening during the next 12 to 18 hours, according to the NHC’s 5 p.m. discussion. Shear around the core of the storm appears low as the storm is intensifying. The warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico are aiding in its strengthening.

The ridge of high pressure centered off the Mid Atlantic coast will begin to fade and move and drift eastward. This will allow an upper-level trough positioned near New Mexico and Colorado to begin to steer Michael more northeastward on Wednesday. The forecast has not changed much since the last full advisory at 11 a.m. Tuesday, with guidance models having Michael making landfall near Panama City Wednesday afternoon. But it’s important to note that conditions will deteriorate ahead of the center of circulation. Some of the outer bands may make it to the coast Wednesday morning.

Storm surge, wind, heavy rain and a threat for tornadoes will be the hazards starting Wednesday.


By: WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
October 9, 2018 - 3:11 p.m.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- The latest on Hurricane Michael:

3:11 p.m.

The 2 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. The storm is located about 335 miles south of Panama City and is moving north at 12 mph.

Gov. Rick Scott spoke in Eastpoint this afternoon:

Tuesday afternoon, emergency management officials in Leon County provided an update on the hurricane and local preparations:

11:00 a.m.

The 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. The storm is located about 360 miles south of Panama City.

Remember that hurricane categories only refer to the wind speed. The effects of Michael will go beyond wind. The storm is moving north at 12 mph.

So far, landfall is expected to be between late Wednesday or during the afternoon. While the center of Michael is forecast to make landfall west of the Apalachicola River, local impacts remain the same.


  • Coast: 8-12 ft storm surge, coastal flooding, flash flooding, hurricane-force wind possible (75+ mph)
  • Inland: Flash flooding, tropical storm-force winds (39+ mph) possible

    Inland winds will not be 100+ mph. After landfall, Michael is expected to weaken as it quickly moves northeast.

    Updates will also be available on the WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team Facebook and WCTV Weather App for video updates, the forecast, and radar.

    8 a.m.

    The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph. The storm is located about 395 miles south of Panama City, moving NNW at 12 mph.


    2 a.m.

    The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph. The storm is located about 455 miles south of Panama City, moving NNW at 12 mph.


    By: WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 8, 2018

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- The latest on Hurricane Michael:

    11 p.m.

    The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph. The storm is located about 450 miles south of Apalachicola, and 485 miles south of Panama City, moving N at 12 mph.

    8 p.m.

    The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. The storm is located about 60 miles NW of the western tip of Cuba, moving N at 12 mph.

    4:50 p.m.

    The latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Hurricane Michael as a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph. The storm is located about 30 miles NW of the western tip of Cuba, moving N at 9 mph.


    3:45 p.m.

    At last check, the National Hurricane Center in Miami says Michael's top sustained winds were around 75 mph. The storm was moving north around 7 mph.

    Florida Gov. Rick Scott says Hurricane Michael is a "monstrous storm" that has the potential to be devastating to the Florida Panhandle.

    Speaking alongside emergency officials in Pasco County, Scott said Monday he's waiving tolls. He also has declared a state of emergency for 35 counties and asked President Donald Trump for assistance ahead of the storm.

    The full press conference is available below:

    The governor warns that storm surge could be as high as 8-10 feet (2.4-3 meters) in some parts of the Panhandle and 2-4 feet (0.6-1.2 meters) in the Tampa Bay area. Scott is urging people along the Gulf Coast to finish their storm preparations Monday evening.

    2 p.m.

    Hurricane Michael is lashing the western tip of Cuba with heavy rainfall and strong winds.

    The National Hurricane Center in Miami says Michael's top sustained winds were around 75 mph. The storm was moving north around 7 mph.

    The storm was centered about 20 miles off the western tip of Cuba, and about 145 miles east-northeast of Cozumel, Mexico.

    Forecasters say Michael will move into very warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico. It could strengthen into a major hurricane with winds topping 111 mph before an expected strike Wednesday on Florida's Panhandle.

    Meanwhile, long-lived Tropical Storm Leslie was expected to gradually strengthen over the Atlantic Ocean but was no threat to the U.S. coastline.

    11 a.m.

    The 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center shows Michael as a Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds at 75 miles per hour. The storm is located approximately 50 miles south of the western tip of Cuba, and is moving north at 7 miles per hour.

    Michael is forecast to make landfall by mid-week in Florida's Panhandle or Big Bend area.



    By: WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 8, 2018





    By: Brittany Bedi | WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 7, 2018 - 11 p.m.

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- As of the 11PM advisory from the National Hurricane Center, tropical storm Michael has winds of 60 mph. It is slowly moving north at 5 mph. As it moves north into the Gulf of Mexico, it will encounter warm waters and less wind shear, allowing it to strengthen into a hurricane by Monday night. There hasn't been much change since the 8 PM intermediate advisory.

    Michael could continue to strengthen into a category 2 hurricane prior to landfall. The exact landfall time is still uncertain, but so far is expected to be sometime Wednesday afternoon.

    The exact landfall location is also uncertain. If it happens west of the Apalachicola River, this would bring onshore winds. Storm surge will be a threat Wednesday.

    The specifics of wind speed, rainfall amounts, and storm surge heights are still uncertain. We should get a better idea of the specifics by Monday afternoon.

    The Big Bend and South Georgia should prepare for tropical storm force winds by Wednesday. Winds in excess of 40 mph would be enough to knock over trees, power lines, and cause power outages. Heavy rain and flash flooding is also possible. The possibility of hurricane-force winds will be highest along the immediate coast and closest to Michael's center around landfall.

    Any small changes in the forecast path in the next 24 hours will lead to a large change by Wednesday, so it is important to continue to prepare for the storm through Tuesday.

    The next update showing changes with Michael will likely happen around 5AM.


    By: Brittany Bedi | WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 7, 2018 - 8 p.m.

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- Tropical storm Michael continues to churn in the Caribbean. It is looking a little better organized on satellite imagery.

    As of the 8PM intermediate update from the National Hurricane Center, Michael has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph. Even though it was impacted by wind shear earlier, it still is holding together. Michael is moving north at 3 mph. It will enter the Gulf of Mexico in an environment with less wind shear and warmer, shallower waters. This will help it intensify into a hurricane by Tuesday with continued strengthening through mid-week. Landfall is forecast for sometime on Wednesday as a strong category 2 storm, possibly reaching category 3 strength.

    Forecast models are in good agreement with Michael's northward motion into the Gulf of Mexico. This is because it will be between an area of high pressure in the western Atlantic Ocean and a trough of low pressure over the central U.S.

    It is important to note that there is still uncertainty for the exact point the center of the storm will make landfall. That landfall point will determine the specific local impacts for North Florida and South Georgia. Areas through the Florida Panhandle and Big Bend need to prepare for coastal flooding and storm surge, though the exact heights are not set in stone yet. Remember, storm impacts reach out farther than just a forecast cone. That is why all of North Florida and South Georgia need to complete storm preparations before Tuesday night.

    The main local threats will be high winds. Winds will be highest along the coast and closest to the center of Michael's circulation. Inland areas could get tropical storm-force winds by Wednesday. Winds of 40+ mph are enough to cause widespread power outages.


    Storm surge is also a possibility if the center of Michael remains to the west of our area as forecast. This would lead to onshore winds. Coastal communities should prepare for coastal flooding and storm surge. Bother inland and coastal areas should also prepare for flash flooding.

    More specifics should become available on Monday. Until then, storm preparations are key, not panic.


    By: Charles Roop | WCTV Pinpoint Weather
    October 7, 2018 - 1:05 p.m.

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- The National Hurricane Center upgraded Tropical Depression Fourteen to tropical-storm status Sunday afternoon as Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance aircraft was en route to the storm.


    The NHC had Michael centered 90 miles south of Cozumel, Mexico as it moved northward at 6 mph as of a 12:55 p.m. EDT update. Maximum sustained winds were at 40 mph with a minimum central pressure of 1004 millibars.

    Tropical Storm Michael appeared asymmetrical around noon Sunday as the convection remained on the eastern-half of the tropical depression. The storm was still being impacted by moderate westerly shear.

    The storm is expected to move northward into a less-sheared environment, leaving the door open for further intensification. Sea surface temperatures remain 80-plus degrees with some waters in the Gulf of Mexico over 85 degrees. The warm waters will be another element into intensification.

    The NHC's official forecast has Michael being considered a hurricane by Wednesday morning in the central Gulf of Mexico. As a ridge of high pressure aloft weakens to the storm's east, a trough of low pressure aloft will help move it northeastward sometime Wednesday. Michael is projected to then accelerate in speed northeastward into the Mid Atlantic Thursday into Friday as a weaker system.


    Specifics on landfall and intensity are uncertain; therefore, impacts to specific areas remain uncertain. But there are increased odds of rainfall in our area. Rainfall totals ranging from 1 to 4 inches with locally higher amounts are possible through Friday morning. The NHC has increased the odds of tropical-storm-force winds in parts of our viewing area to over 50 percent.

    Gov. Rick Scott tweeted Sunday that he would declare a State of Emergency for the Big Bend and Florida panhandle.


    Those in the Big Bend and South Georgia should monitor the progress of this storm over the next couple of days.


    By: Brittany Bedi | WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 6, 2018 - 11 p.m.

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV)-- The 11PM update from the National Hurricane Center shows little change in the forecast path for Potential Tropical Cyclone 14. It is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm by Sunday night. If that happens, it will be tropical storm Michael.

    Exact landfall location is still uncertain, so the Mississippi coast to the Big Bend should continue to monitor this system.

    A ridge of high pressure in the western Atlantic Ocean will help steer it northward over the Gulf of Mexico. A trough of low pressure is expected to help steer it northeast after landfall. So far, landfall is possible on Wednesday.

    Local threats are expected to be periods of heavy rain, high winds gusts along the immediate coast, and a higher risk of rip currents.


    By: Brittany Bedi | WCTV Pinpoint Weather Team
    October 6, 2018 - 9 p.m.

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) -- The National Hurricane Center is beginning to issue advisories for Potential Tropical Cyclone 14.

    That may seem like a long name. It means that the cluster of clouds and thunderstorms near the Yucatan Peninsula is expected to strengthen into the next tropical depression or tropical storm. The title of PTC 14 allows the National Hurricane Center to issue a forecast cone and advisories even though the disturbance hasn't reached tropical storm strength yet.

    PTC 14 is forecast to organize and strengthen into a tropical storm by Monday afternoon. If that happens, it will be named Michael.

    As of the 8PM advisory from the NHC, it has maximum sustained winds of 30 mph.

    The 8 PM forecast shows continued movement north through the Gulf of Mexico. While it could strengthen to a tropical storm, it will encounter wind shear. So far, it is forecast to make landfall somewhere between the Mississippi coast and the Big Bend in Florida. That leaves a 300+ mile margin of error. There is also some uncertainty as to how strong it will be at landfall.

    Regardless of the storm's exact landfall location , local impacts will mainly be rain. High wind gusts are possible along the coast. Landfall could be sometime on Wednesday. If the storm makes landfall west of our local area, that would bring winds from the south, and leave the local region with high rain chances.

    Forecasters will get a better idea of landfall location on Monday. Until then, it is not a reason to panic in the Big Bend and South Georgia, but instead review storm plans and storm kits.

    After landfall, it is expected to weaken and quickly move northeast and away from North Florida and South Georgia.



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