Send your coronavirus questions to WCTV

By: WCTV Eyewitness News
April 3, 2020

Have a coronavirus question you need answering? Send an email to news@wctv.tv with "VIEWER CORONAVIRUS QUESTION" as the subject line, and our newsroom will work to find the answer.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — As you continue to send in questions about COVID-19 to us, WCTV gets the experts who are most equipped to answer those questions.

Dr. Christie Alexander from Florida State University's College of Medicine has answered the majority of your medical questions surrounding coronavirus.

On her Friday appearance on WCTV's 4 p.m. show, Dr. Alexander showcased what masks she and other healthcare workers at Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare are using while responding to coronavirus.

Here are the questions she answered from the drive-thru testing site at the Northwood Centre:

—What's it been like at the center today?
—Why is there a delay in getting test results? Is the delay contributing to the growing number of cases?
—Based on what you've seen at the Northwood Centre, are the workers properly protected, and do they have what they need to stay safe?
—Can you tell us more about the difference between the masks that are recommended for healthcare workers and the ones the general public might wear?
—Should people wear masks out in public to help stop the spread of the virus?
—Is there any danger to kids playing outside as long as they're 6 feet apart?

In order for us to keep giving you the local perspective on the virus, we need your input. Continue to send your coronavirus questions to our email news@wctv.tv with "VIEWER CORONAVIRUS QUESTION" as the subject line, and our newsroom will work to find the answer.


By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 30, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — Dr. Christie Alexander from the Florida State University College of Medicine once again joined WCTV's 4 p.m. show to answer your coronavirus questions.

You can watch her full segment, as well as her previous appearances on WCTV, above.

Here are the latest batch of questions she answered:

—How are you and the local medical community doing as the pandemic continues?
—Are we flattening the curve successfully?
—Major cities like New York and Los Angeles are getting outside help from the government with Naval hospitals being docked at their ports. Do you think that will be enough?
—Where are we on new treatments? We've heard about a malaria drug that may be effective, is there any scientific evidence behind that?
—At your clinic, are you seeing a lot of people who are afraid they might have COVID-19?
—What are you seeing and hearing from local colleagues about the supply of medical gear?
—Is there anything else you would like to tell our viewers at home?



By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 20, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — A Florida State University College of Medicine professor joined WCTV's Ben and Katie Kaplan over the phone to answer more of your coronavirus questions.

Dr. Christie Alexander has been on our show several times now. You can watch her previous appearances above.

Here are the questions she answered during Friday's show:

—We know it's been a hectic time for the medical community—how has it been like for you?
—What would you say to younger, healthy people who might have been ignoring precautions and going about their daily lives?
—When we're social distancing, is it still OK to go outside?
—Is it safe to order takeout or go pickup food at a drive thru?
—If you do go out in public, do you need to then wash your clothes, take a shower or take other precautions?
—Once someone gets COVID-19 and recovers, are they then immune? Is the virus still in their system? Could they still spread it once symptoms are gone?
—Anything else you'd like to mention?

Copyright 2020 WCTV. All rights reserved.

By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 19, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — Dr. Christie Alexander of Florida State University's College of Medicine joined WCTV once again to answer questions about coronavirus.

This time, the interview was conducted over the phone, adhering to social distancing standards.

Alexander explained in depth the importance of social distancing, and how it helps the phenomenon of "flattening the curve," which represents the healthcare system's capacity to combat coronavirus.

Here are the questions she answered this time around:
Can you explain what "flattening the curve is" and how following certain protocols can help?
Why are some people tested and others aren't? Can you explain the clinical testing criteria healthcare providers are following right now?
If someone is diagnosed and quarantining at home, what major steps should be taken to protect family living with them?
We got a question from some grandparents who are in their 60's and 70's, both with underlying health conditions. Their grandkids are out of school and they were going to stay with the grandparents to help mom and dad. Should they do that?
Should we cancel routine appointments for dental cleanings, eye exams, hearing aid fittings, blood work, mammograms, etc.?


By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 13, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — As the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic continues to evolve, WCTV wants you to send in your questions about the virus. This will allow us to highlight the local and regional perspective on the outbreak in our coverage.

On our Friday 4 p.m. show, Dr. Christie Alexander of Florida State University's College of Medicine joined WCTV's Katie and Ben Kaplan on set to answer your questions.

Alexander answered the following questions on the segment that aired on March 13:
—How are coronavirus and its symptoms treated? Are there any effective treatments?
—Is there any information about the progress on a possible vaccine?
—What is considered the normal high temperature for this virus?
—Will a flu shot or anti-viral drugs like Tamiflu help minimize symptoms?
—What populations are most at risk of serious illness or death?
—Are seniors who've had the pneumonia vaccine in less danger?
—Can the virus be transmitted to pets?

In order for us to keep giving you the local perspective on the virus, we need your input. Continue to send your coronavirus questions to our email news@wctv.tv with "VIEWER CORONAVIRUS QUESTION" as the subject line, and our newsroom will work to find the answer.

For more information about the coronavirus, visit the links below:
Florida Department of Health COVID-19 information
CDC general information
CDC resources
CDC community mitigation guidance for coronavirus
World Health Organization general information
WHO video
Water Quality & Health Council FAQ

You can find questions Dr. Alexander answered on her previous appearance below.


By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 6, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — With the emergence of the COVID-19 coronavirus in our area, we encourage our viewers to send in their questions about the virus.

On our 4 p.m. show, Dr. Christie Alexander of Florida State University's Medical School joined WCTV's Katie and Ben Kaplan on set to answer your questions.

Is a person who has the virus but isn't showing any symptoms still able to transmit it to other people?

A: Yes. First and foremost, I have to say there is a lot we still don't know about this virus. It's very very important that we are checking in with the target="_blank">CDC's website on a regular basis. They're going to have up to the minute information about what's going on.

That said, to answer that question: Yes. The simple answer is yes. You can be completely asymptomatic, and be transmitting the virus. Like other viruses, it can take a couple of days to start developing symptoms, like the flu for example.

So, as you're starting to get sick, you may not feel so bad, but could be shedding the virus.

How do you tell the difference between symptoms of coronavirus compared to a cold or the flu?

A: Very good question. So, yes, they all look very similar, right? A cold, less severe, you might have some sniffles, cough. You might feel a little run down. But you're probably not going to have a high-grade fever.

With the flu though, you will have a fever. You're going to have body aches, night sweats, chills. You're gonna not feel well. You're going to have these symptoms.

With coronavirus, the overlap is that with corona you have fever, cough, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. So it's going to be hard to tell the difference sometimes, whether it's the flu, whether it's the cold, with the exception of that fever.

And I should add that a fever is anything above 100.4 degrees. Below that, it's not going to constitute as such, which is important in regards to having a thermometer on hand, so you can be checking these things if you feel sick.

Can you get the virus by touching things like a door knob, money handled by an infected person, or mail or packages shipped from China?

A: The thing about this is it can be any surface, not just door knobs, not just money, not just that, but pretty much any surface. If somebody sneezes or coughs and it lands, the respiratory droplets land on a surface, and you go behind them and accidentally touch that surface or grab the door knob, things like that, you can have it on your hands.

The big thing is not touching your face after that, washing your hands right after that. If you do touch your face, it's the mouth, nose and eyes where it's transmitted the most, so keeping in check with that.

So, any surface can do it. Now the good news is, once those respiratory droplets dry, it's a pretty short lived thing. It's not going to live on packages or money or things like that very long. But, if it's recent and they cough, and you go right behind them, you could pick it up on your hands and transmit it to yourself.

Why is the CDC recommending healthcare workers wear protective masks, but not the general public?

A: We are in contact with very, very sick people. The sickest of the sick. So we're using those really important N-95 masks to prevent against those respiratory droplets from getting into our systems. Those are things like tuberculosis. We use those same masks for that.

We need to protect ourselves, so we can continue taking care of the sick people we're seeing. The masks that you see around town that are covering the face and go around the ears, those are best used for people who are currently ill. If you're sick and you're coughing, sneezing or things like that, those masks keep those respiratory droplets towards you, instead of being shot out into the general public.

If you're feeling well and wearing a mask like that in the general public, it's not as protective as you may think. It's not protecting you from getting sick, as much as protecting somebody who is sick from transmitting it. Those taking care of the sick wear a mightier mask to keep us from getting sick.

What are the best precautionary measures the public can take?

A: So, we talked about hand washing. The big thing with that is 20 seconds, at least, and really washing your hands. Most people don't spend 20 seconds washing their hands. They're quick to wash, rinse and go. So washing your hands for 20 seconds - with soap and water, I might add, not just water - is key.

If you don't have access because you're out and about, or something like this, carrying around hand sanitizer, doing the same action, as you're washing your hands, with hand sanitizer that has at least 60% alcohol, is the way to go with that.

Beyond that, being careful when you touch things, to wipe down surfaces, when you can. Now you don't have to go crazy with this, but as you're wiping down surfaces, think about the most high-touched surfaces: Phones, keyboards, doorknobs, counters, toilet handles - things that people are touching frequently. Those are the types of things to be wiping down.

If you are sick or you have a little cold and you need to cough or you need to sneeze, do that into a tissue and throw the tissue away. If you don't have access to a tissue, cough into your elbow or your arm, so you're not transmitting the droplets.

If you have to cough into your hand or sneeze into your hand, immediately wash your hands with soap and water or with hand sanitizer. So those are some basic things you can do.

Last but not least, if you are sick, stay home and call your doctor. Don't go out and, hopefully not, transmit it to others. Stay home, call your physician, see what they'd like you to do. They may not even want you to come in, depending on how sick you are.

If you don't have a physician, call the Leon County Health Department. They can direct you accordingly. If you're not sure what to do beyond that, just call one of the ER's, call an urgent care center. Just call before you go, is the main thing

If someone gets the coronavirus, then recovers, can they get re-infected?

A: We aren't sure. That's one of those unknowns at this point. This is something to check the CDC website on. Again, there's things getting updated to the minute. It's important to get in contact with the folks who know.


In order for us to keep giving you the local perspective on the virus, we need your input. Continue to send your coronavirus questions to our email news@wctv.tv with "VIEWER CORONAVIRUS QUESTION" as the subject line, and our newsroom will work to find the answer.

For more information about the coronavirus, visit the links below:
Florida Department of Health COVID-19 information
CDC general information
CDC resources
CDC community mitigation guidance for coronavirus
World Health Organization general information
WHO video
Water Quality & Health Council FAQ

Copyright 2020 WCTV. All rights reserved.


By: WCTV Eyewitness News
March 2, 2020

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) — On Monday, March 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially confirmed Florida's first cases of COVID-19 coronavirus. Monday evening, Gov. Brian Kemp confirmed that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has positively identified two Georgia residents with the coronavirus.

Although coronavirus has dominated the national news cycle, the virus' presence in our region is relatively new.

WCTV is here to bring you the local perspective on the virus. In order to tailor our coverage for that perspective, we need your input.

If you have a coronavirus question that needs answering, send an email to news@wctv.tv with "VIEWER CORONAVIRUS QUESTION" as the subject line, and our newsroom will work to find the answer.

On Friday, March 6, Dr. Christie Alexander of Florida State University Medical School answered your questions during our 4 p.m. show.

For more information about the coronavirus, visit the links below:
Florida Department of Health COVID-19 information
CDC general information
CDC resources
CDC community mitigation guidance for coronavirus
World Health Organization general information
WHO video
Water Quality & Health Council FAQ

You can find WCTV's previous coronavirus coverage below:

TMH opens city's first drive-thru COVID-19 sample collection center
More than 300 COVID-19 coronavirus cases reported in Florida
Local bars and clubs prepare for 30 day closure
Thomasville's Archibold Medicsl Center opening COVID-19 screening sites
Free meals available across Big Bend, South Georgia
Governor: Florida workers need immediate economic relief
Florida K-12 school testing canceled this year, Gov. DeSantis says
Gov. DeSantis orders bars and nightclubs to close, announced 4 UF students have coronavirus

Gov. DeSantis declares state of emergency due to coronavirus
13th positive COVID-19 case announced in Florida
Florida House members cleared of coronavirus
Florida State does not "intend" to activate a distance learning contingency plan
University of Florida urges professors to teach classes online due to coronavirus
4th presumptive positive case of COVID-19 coronavirus reported in Florida, Gov. DeSantis says
3rd positive presumptive COVID-19 coronavirus case reported in Florida, DeSantis says
Gov. DeSantis says public risk low as Florida monitors coronavirus, CDC confirms two positive cases
Georgia Gov. Kemp confirms two cases of coronavirus
Local governments prepare for coronavirus, schools buy extra sanitizing supplies
FSU cancels Florence spring programs, plans to close center there
FDH: Two presumptive positive coronavirus cases in Florida
Why are scientists so concerned about new coronavirus?
CDC: Coronavirus has been around since the mid-1960s, but has different types
FAMU and FSU suspend University-related travel due to Coronavirus
"I felt like I was in a movie:" FSU student in Italy shares how her study abroad suddenly ended

Copyright 2020 WCTV. All rights reserved.