Updated Florida influenza report

By: Ryan Kaufman | WCTV Eyewitness News
UPDATE: November, 29, 2019

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - Week 47 of Florida's flu season has seen an uptick in cases compared to the previous week.

The latest report indicates that one out of every ten visits to an ER or urgent care center by a child was for flu like symptoms.

FDH is showing the most common type of the flu being diagnosed this season is still Influenza B. This was also the case in week 46. Typically, Florida sees Influenza A with subtypes H1N1 or H3 as the predominate strain.

The only change in flu activity within our area would be Leon county which has been upgraded to "moderate" activity from "mild" activity. Wakulla, Gadsden, and Taylor are all in the "mild" category.

The latest trend in flu like activity does show all of the counties within our region (Gadsden, Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor and Hamilton counties) in the "increasing activity" category. So one can assume, the sickness isn't going away anytime soon.

As always, the CDC recommends getting the flu shot while you can to help prevent contracting the flu.

For more information on this report, click the link in the “related documents” section at the top of this page.


ORIGINAL STORY
November 21, 2019

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) – According to the Florida Department of Health, flu and flu-like illness is increasing across the state. The new report from FDH also shows the current levels for week 46 (November 10th through November 16th, 2019) are higher than week 46 in 2018.

Week 46 data shows 52 counties in Florida (including Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, and Taylor) are yielding “mild influenza activity”. Only four counties have “moderate activity” and 11 with “no activity.”

FDH says it is still too early in the season to say exactly, which version of influenza is the predominate strain, but did say “influenza B Victoria lineage” is the most documented type thus far. According to a study published from the CDC (2018), this particular strain of influenza typically impacts younger children and slowly falls off past the age of 30. The other strain of Influenza B, “Yamagata” is prominent in both young adults (0-15) and in older adults (50-80). Type A influenza has been the predominate strain across Florida since 2009. These strains consist of the “H1N1” or “Swine Flu, 2009” as well as “H3”.

Since week 40 of the influenza season, or the beginning of October 2019, the percent of ER and urgent care visits for possible influenza cases have been above the numbers from 2018/2019 back to 2016/2017.

As always, the CDC recommends getting the flu shot while you can to help prevent contracting the flu.

For more information on this report, click the link in the “related documents” section at the top of this page.



Related Documents